Wednesday, November 13, 2019
 

MEMS along the Value Chain

14:00 Introduction
14:05
Factors Affecting the Market Landscape for Sensors
  Noman Akhtar, Analyst - Industrial Semiconductors and Sensors, IHS Markit
Factors Affecting the Market Landscape for Sensors
Noman Akhtar

Noman Akhtar
Analyst - Industrial Semiconductors and Sensors
IHS Markit

Noman Akhtar

Abstract
Sensors are found in a wide range of applications and industry sectors and the market is as a result in good health overall. While consumer sensors are adopted rapidly and wax and wane rather more quickly as markets, new sensing applications quickly emerge to keep MEMS sensor suppliers busy. While smartphones still represent a huge market, commoditization has left it saturated in value terms, but growth has recently moved to other accessories like smart watches or wireless earbuds from leading suppliers like Apple. Such devices are becoming very smart, involving multiple accelerometers and silicon microphones per set, and potential further functionality on the way in the form of heart rate, even oxygen saturation, and blood pressure. Talking of pressure, this sensor was recently adopted in e-cigarettes for puff detection. Other mainstays like automotive and industry, on the other hand, are subject to longer-term trends like electrification and robotization of the car, as well as Industry 4.0, big data and condition monitoring. Meanwhile, autonomous cars or taxis are not the only markets to watch: automation of many functions is taking place, e.g. in smart cities, smart building such as warehouses and logistics operations, in logistics and package tracking, in drones for surveying and mapping. Agriculture is also benefiting from sensors, drones are used for crop spraying, for example, and other sensors are used to monitor other key metrics like acidity, etc. Robotics and automation implies many sensing devices including position, motion and pressure sensors. This presentation looks at the impact of these major market changes on MEMS and other silicon sensors.

Biography
Mr. Noman Akhtar, a research analyst at IHS Markit, focuses on the Industrial market dynamics on semiconductors and sensor. Noman shares his expertise with the IHS Markit semiconductor team and leverages his deep understanding of the impact on industrial sensors and semiconductors along with analyzing its supply chain.He has deep technical knowledge in electronic component especially power electronics component in industrial semiconductor applications such as in factory automation, lighting, security, energy, medical, power and energy, military and aerospace segments systems. He manages the data quality of IHS Markit semiconductor and sensors market share databases and its timely delivery to clients. His responsibilities also include the synthesis of worldwide economic trends to help generate accurate market forecasts. Prior to this, Noman Akhtar led IHS Markit smart city intelligence service and had developed a broad understanding of smart cities project, related technologies, and regional business strategies. He also has a strong understanding of smart home appliances, robots and their semiconductor BOM within the consumer electronics segment. Noman joined IHS Markit in May 2014. Noman holds a Master of Science in Power Engineering specializing in power electronics in smart industry, smart home and smart grid electronics from the Technical University of Munich, Germany and a Bachelor of Science in Electronic Engineering from Sir Syed University of Engineering and Technology in Karachi, Pakistan. He is based in Munich, Germany.

14:25
A Roadmap for the future inline control and yield management in MEMS production
  Ines Thurner, CEO, Convanit GmbH&Co.KG
A Roadmap for the future inline control and yield management in MEMS production
Ines Thurner

Ines Thurner
CEO
Convanit GmbH&Co.KG

Ines Thurner

Abstract
The International Roadmap for Devices and Systems (IRDS) initiative focuses on maintaining a 15 year roadmap leveraging work of roadmap teams closely aligned with the advancement of the devices and systems industries. Led by an international roadmap committee (IRC), International Focus Teams (IFTs) collaborate in the development of a roadmap to help ensure alignment and consensus across a range of stakeholders. The IRDS roadmap is separated into chapters. Within the chapter of Yield Enhancement the specific requirements on inline control and yield management of MEMS production is described.New inspection and characterization challenges are generated in the production of MEMS specific technologies, devices and materials. Those cannot be covered with the existing mainstream solutions and need new innovation and solutions.These new techniques are mainly not yet available on production reliable level. Development of trend-setting methods and furthermore adaption to productive level are necessary.The roadmap describes all MEMS related requirements like wafer thickness handling, task specific inspection challenges, CD measurement, aspect ratio and material related challenges.

Biography
2010 - now Senior Consultant Yield Management, CONVANIT 2005 - 2009, Technical Manager for Yield Enhancement, Qimonda Dresden 2002 - 2005, Project Manager for Defect Density Methodology, Infineon Technologies Munich1997 - 2001, Manager of Defect Density Group, Infineon Technologies USA1993 - 1997, Process Engineer Integration, SMST GmbH Stuttgart1989 - 1993, Process Engineer for Process Control, IBM GmbH StuttgartMaster in Physics, 1989, University of Karlsruhe

14:45 Pushing the Limits: Recent Advancements in the Optical Characterization of MEMS Devices
  Markus Heilig, Polytec
15:05 TBA
  Juergen Niess, HQ-Dielectrics GmbH
15:25
New technology for inhalers and sprays for a healthier world
  Wietze Nijdam, Technology Manager, Medspray BV
New technology for inhalers and sprays for a healthier world
Wietze Nijdam

Wietze Nijdam
Technology Manager
Medspray BV

Wietze Nijdam

Abstract
Medspray is inventor and manufacturer of innovative spray nozzles. Located at ‘Kennispark’, the business and science park of Twente University in the Netherlands, Medspray uses nano technology to create spray nozzles from silicon with tiny orifices (approximately 2 micrometer in diameter) for a fine nebulization. For reference, a human hair has a diameter of 70 microns.Medspray is ISO 13485 certified for development and manufacturing of medical devices. The production of spray nozzles is located at Medspray in Enschede, in dedicated ISO 7 clean rooms. World wide partners assemble Medspray’s nozzles in mutually developed spray devices. In the summer of 2019 Medspray expects to make its 1 millionth spray nozzle unit, in 2020 we expect to scale further to a production of more than 1 million nozzles per month.Medspray’s mission is based on sustainability. The use of propellants in spray cans for cosmetics and in inhalers can be completely avoided by using Medspray nozzles and simple mechanisms like a plastic pump. Current HFA pMDIs (pressurized metered dose inhalers for e.g. Asthma and COPD) have a similar CO2 exhaust as a car trip of 290 km!Since the inhaler devices have entered the public domain, our nozzles also have caught the attention of other industries, such as cosmetics. Ap apparently the requirements of a spray for the pharmaceutical industry also apply for the cosmetics industry: long actuation time (multiple seconds), narrow particle size distribution, tuneable spray cone and propellant free operation.Medspray, tiny technology for a sustainable future.

Biography
Wietze Nijdam is responsible for technology development at Medspray BV, the Netherlands. Medspray develops novel technology for liquid inhalers and spray devices, based on their proprietary micro nano technology spray nozzles. Wietze joined Medspray eleven years ago to industrialize early developments and outsource silicon.Wietze (born in 1970) has a background in silicon processing (M.Sc. Electrical Engineering, University of Twente) with specialization in perforated thin membranes. After graduation Wietze has worked more than 10 years in MEMS on development of filtration membranes and was involved in the start-up of Medspray.

15:45
Cutting-edge Plasma Dicing for wafer singulation applied to MEMS devices
  James Weber, Business Development Manager, Panasonic Industry Europe GmbH
Cutting-edge Plasma Dicing for wafer singulation applied to MEMS devices
James Weber

James Weber
Business Development Manager
Panasonic Industry Europe GmbH

James Weber

Abstract
Authors: James Weber*1, Atsushi Harikai*2, Kiyoshi Arita*2*1: Panasonic Industry Europe GmbHRobert-Koch-Straße 100, 85521 Ottobrunn, Germanyjames.weber@eu.panasonic.com*2: Panasonic Smart Factory Solutions Co., Ltd.2-7 Matsuba-cho, Kadoma-City, Osaka, 571-8502, JapanAbstract:MEMS market trends are demanding dies that are thinner, smaller, and stronger. Conventional line-by-line dicing methods, such as mechanical sawing (“blade dicing”) or laser dicing, are not suitable for fragile MEMS devices, both in terms of economics and reliability.Plasma Dicing is an alternative method to overcome the many challenges of MEMS wafer singulation that are encountered during conventional line-by-line dicing methods.Plasma Dicing for MEMS wafers utilizes plasma trench etch (“dry etch”) technology and is damage-free (no chipping, no cracking), offers smoother sidewalls, is particle-free and enables high-throughput. In addition, flexible chip shape design—including round and offset chips is possible.Plasma Dicing is performed by opening dicing streets on a mask on the wafer surface, and etching where the wafer surface has been exposed. Several masking techniques suitable for MEMS wafers that have been developed by Panasonic can be offered. The throughput of Plasma Dicing depends principally on the thickness of the wafer, and is independent from wafer size, chip size and chip shape. By utilizing Plasma Dicing for MEMS, higher throughput and higher quality than conventional dicing can be achieved. As market trends demand smaller-and-smaller chip sizes—as is typical for MEMS devices—Plasma Dicing offers many benefits when compared to those of conventional line-by-line dicing methods; especially in terms of cost savings and quality increases.Patented techniques, processes and new equipment developed by Panasonic allow for low cost-of-ownership Plasma Dicing of MEMS wafers, and will be discussed in this paper.

Biography
James completed a degree in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Adelaide in Australia in 2006. Since then he has held various roles in Field-test Engineering, Technical Support Engineering, Project Management & Sales for different companies; mainly in the oil and gas industry. Since 2016 he has been the Business Development Manager for microelectronics at Panasonic Factory Solutions Europe. James' main targets are to establish new business in the European Back-end and Front-end Industry; especially in the field of Plasma Dicing and Dry Etching Equipment, but also Plasma Cleaning, Die-attach and Flip-chip technologies.

16:05 TBD
16:25 Closing Remarks & End