Wednesday, October 7, 2015
Agenda

10:15 Introduction
10:30
How Semiconductor Technology can contribute to Innovative Biomedical Systems
  Peter Simkens, Managing Director, DSP Valley
How Semiconductor Technology can contribute to Innovative Biomedical Systems
Peter Simkens

Peter Simkens
Managing Director
DSP Valley

Abstract
Thanks to Moore's law, the semiconductor industry has built up a lot of experience in how to produce large volumes of products in a very miniaturised form and at a very low cost, and with a highly increased computing performance.
Modern biomedical systems are facing similar challenges: clinical tests on human fluids have to miniaturised in order to bring them closer to the patient, responding to the needs of personalised medecine. The analysis of the human genome, DNA sequencing and cell sorting (e.g. for early cancer detection) from their side require tremendously increased compute power. Just as in Moore's law, an exponential increase of the available compute power is required in order to make personalised medecine happen.
By combining the experience of mass production from the semiconductor industry with the techniques from the biotech, new solutions for the above described challenges can be unlocked.
This presentation will discuss the required cross-fertilisation between the two Key Enabling Technologies of micro/nano-electronics and biotech, and will illustrate the potential of this cross-KET approach with some emerging applications.

Biography
Dr. Peter Simkens holds a Master of Science degree in Mechanical Engineering (1984) and a PhD about "3D graphical simulation of sensor controlled robots" (1990), both obtained from KULeuven.
During more than 10 years, Peter Simkens was involved in development projects for the European Space Agency, including the development of training and simulation facilities for European astronauts, and the development of real-time IT-systems for space applications.
In 1998, Peter Simkens became managing director of DSP Valley, the cluster in Smart Electronic Systems, headquartered in Leuven (Belgium). He developed DSP Valley to an outstanding business and innovation cluster, where all participants are connected through strategic partnerships. He has been responsible for the internationalization of this cluster, by setting up an international network of clusters, enabling inter-cluster matchmaking opportunities.
He has transformed the DSP Valley eco-system from a cluster of micro/nano electronics technology providers to a full value chain cluster in smart electronic systems, including applications in smart health systems. Currently, he is building new strategic alliances to exploit the potential of cross-KET innovation, e.g. between micro/nano electronics and biotech (in partnership with FlandersBio), for new health applications in the so-called Nano4Health domain.

11:00 TBA
11:30 TBA
  Bernhard Marsoner, znt Richter
12:00 Biocompatible packaging
  Mario Baum, Fraunhofer ENAS
12:30
Ultra low power microelectronics for wearable and implanted medical devices
  Simon Gray, Head of Marketing & Sales, CSEM
Ultra low power microelectronics for wearable and implanted medical devices
Simon Gray

Simon Gray
Head of Marketing & Sales
CSEM

Abstract
Wearable sensors have been available for years, but have mostly been limited to heart-rate monitoring for athletes. The arrival of smart watches, as well as ubiquitous smart phones, has led to an explosion of wearable sensors and applications for healthcare and wellness. Nevertheless many products today remain bulky and need frequent re-charging, thus limiting more widespread application. This presentation will look at some recent advances in microelectronics for wearable sensors for medtech, from low power ASIC and SOC design, to choices about energy sources, antennas and processing and communication algorithms. It will be illustrated with some recent examples of miniaturised sensors for implantable and wearable sensors from both collaborative research projects as well as innovations for commercial products.

Biography
Simon Gray is responsible for marketing and business development in CSEM's Integrated and Wireless Systems Division. CSEM has been a pioneer in low power ASIC design and is today one of the leading design centers in Europe for ultra low power wireless sensing SOCs and systems. Prior to joining CSEM he held senior technical and marketing positions in the semiconductor industry for companies including Philips, Xemics and Semtech. He has a BSc in Physics from Nottingham University and an MBA from Open University.

13:00 Miniaturization for medical devices
  Frank Murray, CEO, IPDIA
13:30
From Chips in Organs to Organs-on-Chip
  Ronald Dekker, Professor, Philips Research
From Chips in Organs to Organs-on-Chip
Ronald Dekker

Ronald Dekker
Professor
Philips Research

Abstract
Micro-fabricated devices are finding their way to the frontend of medical equipment, where they are the interface between body, or in general living tissue, and machine. They enable better and cheaper diagnostic equipment, they add "eyes and ears" to minimally invasive instruments such as laparoscopic instruments and catheters, they allow for un-obtrusive monitoring of body functions, they add functionality to implants, and they enable the development of better and personalized medicines.
Despite their great promise it has been proven difficult to bring these devices out of the laboratory phase into production. One of the reasons is the lack of a suitable fabrication infrastructure. Much more than standard CMOS or MEMS devices, these medical devices rely on the processing of novel materials, especially polymers, in combination with advanced molding, micro-fluidics, and assembly technologies. At the same time these devices have to be fabricated under strict quality control conditions in a certified production environment.
In the recently granted ECSEL project "InForMed" a supply chain for the pilot fabrication of these medical devices is organized, which brings together key European technology partners in an integrated infrastructure linking research to pilot and high volume production. The pilot line is hosted by Philips Innovation Services, and open to third party users.

Biography
Ronald Dekker received his MSc in Electrical Engineering from the Technical University of Eindhoven and his PhD from the Technical University of Delft. He joined Philips Research in 1988 where he worked on the development of RF technologies for mobile communication. Since 2000 his focus shifted to the integration of complex electronic sensor functionality on the tip of the smallest minimal invasive instruments such as catheters and guide-wires. In 2007 he was appointed part time professor at the Technical University of Delft with a focus on Organ-on-Chip devices. He published in leading Journals and conferences and holds in excess of 50 patents.

14:00
Cost efficient miniaturised silicon micropumps for medical applications
  Martin Richter, Head of Department, Fraunhofer EMFT
Cost efficient miniaturised silicon micropumps for medical applications
Martin Richter

Martin Richter
Head of Department
Fraunhofer EMFT

Abstract
Drug delivery components like micropumps to be in contact with medicals have to be disposable and for that very cost efficient. Beside functional challenges like back pressure, particle tolerance, free flow protection, flow control and dosing accuracy, these cost requirements are hurdles for successful industrialization of micropumps.

The smallest state of the arte micropumps are made of Silicon (e.g. chip sizes: Fraunhofer micropump 7x7 mm2, Debiotech micropump: 6x10 mm2). That chip size makes it very difficult to meet manufacturing costs below 1 $/chip, even at mass production.

It is evident that manufacturing cost scale down with the chip size of the silicon micropump.

With that, to address high volume medical applications like therapy of diabetes or other medical patch pump applications it is essential to shrink the micropump chip furthermore.

On the other side, from physical reasons it is just difficult to meet micropump performance parameters like stroke volume, flow rate, compression ratio or back pressure ability, if the lateral dimensions of the actuation diaphragm will be reduced.

Next, not only the silicon front end technology, also the back end manufacturing steps like piezo mounting has to be cost efficient. Finally, also the fluidic test cost of the micropump chip.

In this presentation an overall strategy will be presented for a Technology platform for Silicon micropumps with small chip sizes down to 3x3 mm2. Results of this strategy regarding piezo mounting on wafer level, fluidic micropump test on wafer level are explained.

Finally, first performance results of a 5x5mm2 micropump chip will be presented

Biography
Martin Richter´s mission is to enable microdosing systems for industrial applications. He studied Technical Physics at the Technical University Munich. His PhD about Simulation and experimental characterisation of microfluidic systems was finished 1998. Since 2000 he is head of department Micromechanics, Actuators and Fluidics of Fraunhofer EMFT in Munich.

14:30
Novel Health Solutions for patients and consumers
  Henk Joos, Managing Director, FlandersBio vzw
Novel Health Solutions for patients and consumers
Henk Joos

Henk Joos
Managing Director
FlandersBio vzw

Abstract
The Health Management space where pharmaceutical and biotech companies traditionally were the sole actors is being disrupted dramatically due to the entrance of new players traditionally active in the food or consumergood space. The presentation is going to explain what are the key causes for this perfect storm, but will also elaborate on the challenges of collaboration in this new space.

The presentaion will also explain the activities that are specifically undertaken in the region of Flanders (Belgium) in order to manage this storm.

Biography
Dr. Henk Joos had a career in different farmer oriented biotech projects in Plant Genetic Systems, AgrEvo, Aventis and Bayer CropScience before he became involved in the development of novel feedstock species for the production of energy.

Dr. Joos became managing director of FlandersBio in December 2013.

15:00 WIRAPLANT – WIReless Active imPLANTs
  Chistian Hedayat, Fraunhofer ENAS
15:30 Measuring biological cells
  Oliver Otto, ZellmechanikDresden
16:00 PolCarrWell – customized PolCarr carriers for easy-to-control, electrostatically driven immobilization of bioMATERIALS
  Heidemarie Schmidt, Dorit Teichmann, HZDR
16:30 End