Thursday, October 8, 2015
Session

Chair Laurent Pain, Patterning Programs Manager, Leti
Laurent Pain

Laurent Pain
Patterning Programs Manager
Leti

Biography
Laurent Pain is graduated from the Ecole Nationale Supérieure de Physique de Grenoble in 1992. He received his Ph D after his work on DUV resists study. He joined CEA-LETI in 1996 to work on infra-red technology, and then came back to microelectronics in 1999 working on 193nm and e-beam lithography technologies.
From 2008 to 2014, Laurent Pain leaded the lithography laboratory of the silicon technology division of CEA-LETI. He was also managing in parallel the industrial consortium IMAGINE dedicated to the development of multibeam lithography with MAPPER lithography BV.
Since July 2014, he took new responsibilities inside the LETI Silicon Technology Division. He is now the Patterning Programs Manager and ensures the associated Business developments.

12:30 Introduction
12:35
Comparison of EUV single exposure vs 193i multiple pattering for N10 BEOL
  Christopher Wilson, BEOL R&D Integration Team Leader, imec
Comparison of EUV single exposure vs 193i multiple pattering for N10 BEOL
Christopher Wilson

Christopher Wilson
BEOL R&D Integration Team Leader
imec

Abstract
Advanced scaling requires innovative pattering solutions to meet half pitch requirements. In this work we compare the pattering integrity results of N10 product like structures using EUV- and 193i-Lithography. Traditional 193i based lithography requires multiple litho etch (LE) or pitch doubling techniques to reach sub resolution pitch. These however add additional films and steps in the pattering process, and introduces CD and overly variability. EUV offers the possibility of single print for advanced nodes with a simplified process. However EUV introduces pattering selectivity and uniformity challenges. The process flows, complexity and results will be presented for EUV single exposure, 193i multiple Litho Etch (LE3), and 193i Spacer Assisted Double Pattering (SADP+Keep).

Biography
Christopher J. Wilson is the BEOL R&D Integration Team Leader and Technical Lead in the Logic Technologies Department, at imec, Belgium. His team is responsible for projects covering advanced node integration, patterning exploration, EUV insertion, advanced and alternative metallization, novel low-k investigation, alternative integration, CPI vehicles, and incite road mapping. He received the PhD degree from Newcastle University, United Kingdom, and MBA degree from the Vlerick Business School, Belgium. Christopher's previous roles at imec include Project Manager and Senior Scientist, where he led a broad range of projects, including: 28nm/22nm/10nm/7nm node low-k dual damascene integration, low-k spin-on polymer evaluation, and synchrotron material analysis. He led imec's first EUV BEOL demonstrator on the alpha-demo tool and has been subsequently involved in imec EUV activates. He is active in the work of imec's Advanced Litho Program, Nano-Interconnect Program and the Beyond CMOS Program.

12:55
High-NA EUV Lithography Optics Enabling sub 9nm Resolution
  Tilmann Heil, Director Lead Systems Engineering, Carl Zeiss SMT GmbH
High-NA EUV Lithography Optics Enabling sub 9nm Resolution
Tilmann Heil

Tilmann Heil
Director Lead Systems Engineering
Carl Zeiss SMT GmbH

Abstract
The semiconductor industry's first production platform for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography, ASML's NXE:3300B, features an all-reflective ZEISS optical system with a numerical aperture (NA) of 0.33, full field size and a 4x magnification. The excellent imaging behavior of this system underlines the extension potential of EUV lithography. Using the well-known formula for resolution Res. = k1 * wavelength / NA and assuming a process factor k1 > 0.3, one can estimate that a NA 0.33 optics configuration eventually enables single shot pattering down to 13nm resolution. Beyond that point, a higher NA is needed to continue the semiconductor shrink roadmap. For example, single shot patterning below 9 nm resolution requires the NA of the projection optics to be substantially larger than 0.45. However, the NXE:3300 EUV projection optics configuration cannot be extended to such a high NA. The increased chief ray angle together with the higher NA at reticle lead to increased shadowing effects and hence unacceptable contrast loss and mask efficiency. Therefore, a solution providing a projection optics with NA >> 0.45 has to be found without increasing the angles at reticle.
In this paper, we demonstrate that the best solution for a sub 9nm resolution optical system with optimized productivity is a direction dependent, so called anamorphic magnification of 4x / 8x. We show that this configuration enables a half field imaging of 26 x 16.5 mm² using a 6'' mask. We discuss potential optical solutions for such an anamorphic high-NA lithography system. In particular, we focus on the impact on the optical design as well as on the needed technology to manufacture such a system. Finally, we investigate the imaging behavior of such an anamorphic optical system, and we demonstrate very good imaging of these designs.

Biography
Dr. Tilmann Heil is currently Director Lead Systems Engineering at Carl Zeiss SMT GmbH. He joined Carl Zeiss in 2002 where he started his career in the field of lithography optics as a scientist for imaging applications. Subsequently, he held several positions in systems engineering, technical marketing, and R&D cooperation program management. He received his Diploma and PhD in Physics from Darmstadt University of Technology in 1997, and 2001, respectively.

13:15
Challenges for the introduction of DSA lithography into manufacturing
  Isabelle Servin, lithography research engineer, CEA-Leti
Challenges for the introduction of DSA lithography into manufacturing
Isabelle Servin

Isabelle Servin
lithography research engineer
CEA-Leti

Abstract
Density multiplication of patterned templates by directed self-assembly (DSA) of block copolymers (BCP) stands out as a promising alternative to overcome the limitation of conventional lithography. Using the 300mm pilot line available at LETI and Arkema's materials, the main objective is to integrate DSA directly into the conventional CMOS lithography process in order to achieve high resolution and pattern density multiplication, at a low cost. This work will present recent achievements at LETI. The potential of DSA will be investigated to address contact and via level patterning, by using the graphoepitaxy of PS-b-PMMA block copolymers. Lithographic performances are both evaluated for contact shrink and contact doubling. Furthermore, in order to prevent from design restrictions, this approach may be extended to more complex structures with multiple contacts and non-hexagonal symmetries. These results show that DSA has a high potential to be integrated directly into the conventional CMOS lithography process in order to perform high resolution contact holes.

Biography
Isabelle Servin is currently 300mm track leader dedicated to multibeam & DSA projects and since 2014, she is responsible of process-integration leader of industrial consortium IMAGINE dedicated to the development of multibeam lithography with MAPPER lithography BV. In 2007 she joined CEA-Leti research center at Grenoble, France working on double patterning lithography and on optical masks. She started her career at ST Microelectronics in the field of optical lithography process for CMOS applications. She received her PhD on polymer chemistry from Paris VI in 1998.

13:35
Litho for 3D Integration / Advanced Packaging
  Michael Toepper, Business Development Manager, Fraunhofer IZM
Litho for 3D Integration / Advanced Packaging
Michael Toepper

Michael Toepper
Business Development Manager
Fraunhofer IZM

Abstract
While several 3-D IC manufacturing programs are expected to ramp soon, experts agree that challenges remain in technology and materials selection, design, test and other critical areas. The 3-D IC market is evolving into the three main segments: "vias first", "vias middle" coming from the foundries with either Cu or W TSVs, and Cu "vias last" from the backside being fabricated by the packaging industry. Interposer type structures mostly called now 2.5 D are included in the last group. Si-Interposers might be an intermediate solution but seems to have currently the potential for an early adaption for production.
For all these approaches thinfilm polymers and photo-resists are necessary materials. For some of the 3-D approaches topography is a real challenge for the polymer deposition process for example for the 3-D packaging process for image sensors using tapered side-walls. But also the exposure of the materials is different due to higher topographies. The different aspect of lithography for 3-D with a focus on liquid-type and dry-film photo-resists and polymers will be discussed in this talk. In addition mask-aligner, litho-tools based on stepping mode and laser ablation will be compared.

Biography
Michael Töpper has a M.S. degree in Chemistry and a PhD in Material Science. Since 1994 he is with the Packaging Research Team at TU Berlin and Fraunhofer IZM. In 1997 he became head of a research group. In 2006 he was also a Research Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Utah, Salt Lake City. The focus of his work was Wafer Level Packaging applications with a focus on materials. Since 2015 he is part of the business development team at Fraunhofer IZM. Michael Töpper is Senior Member of IEEE-CPMT and has received the European Semi-Award in 2007 for WLP.

13:55 Next Generation Track Processes for EUVL, DSA, NIL, E-Beam
  SCREEN SPE Germany GmbH