Tuesday, October 6, 2015
 

13:00 Coffee Break
Session

Business Cases 1

Chair Luigi Occhipinti, Outreach and Business Development Manager, Univ. of Cambridge / EPSRC Centre for Innovative Manufacturing in Large-Area Electronics
Luigi Occhipinti

Luigi Occhipinti
Outreach and Business Development Manager
Univ. of Cambridge / EPSRC Centre for Innovative Manufacturing in Large-Area Electronics

Biography
Dr. Luigi Occhipinti joined the University of Cambridge in April 2014, as Outreach Manager of the EPSRC Center of Innovative Manufacturing for Large Area Electronics, and Business Development Manager of the Cambridge Innovation and Knowledge Centre (CIKC).
He has 20 years of experience driving research and innovation in the global semiconductor industry, pioneering the field of post-silicon technologies, organic and printed electronics, carbon nanotubes and graphene-based flexible electronics, smart systems heterogeneous integration and sensors.
Prior to joining the University of Cambridge, he was R&D Senior Group Manager and Programs Director for Flexible and Disposable Electronics at STMicroelectronics, leading research teams in Italy, France and Singapore and company initiatives for new business development based on Heterogeneous Integration, Flexible and Disposable Electronics, MEMS-based sensors and diagnostic bio-systems.
Luigi has an Electronic Engineering degree and a PhD in Electrical Engineering. He has authored and co-authored over 80 scientific publications and 35 patents.
For more than a decade, Luigi has been an active and recognised expert in the field of OLAE (Organic and Large-Area Electronics) and innovative manufacturing techniques, acting as Project Coordinator and Principal Investigator of more than 12 EC funded programs, under Framework Programme 6 and FP7, in the areas of ICT (Information and Communication Technologies) and NMP (Nanosciences, Nanotechnologies, Materials, and new Production Technologies), and member of 2 IEEE (P1620, P1620.1) and 3 IEC standardization technical committees (TC105, TC111, TC113).

13:30

Keynote

 
Low cost flexible displays and ubiquitous sensors for Wearables, Everywhere-ables and IoT
  Chuck Milligan, CEO, FlexEnable Ltd.
Low cost flexible displays and ubiquitous sensors for Wearables, Everywhere-ables and IoT
Chuck Milligan

Chuck Milligan
CEO
FlexEnable Ltd.

Abstract
Rigid large area displays and sensors today have provided a constraint in design and implementation for so many years that we almost forget until it's pointed out - for example the only flat surface in most cars today is the LCD display.
Large area flexible electronics is the key to activating surfaces in our daily lives - from wearables to car dashboards and windscreens, the ability to conform as well as curve display and sensor surfaces opens up almost limitless applications. Such technology is perfectly complementary to silicon - where cost per unit area (rather than cost per function) is the key economic metric, flexible electronics can broaden silicon's reach into bringing surfaces to life everywhere with displays and sensing.
Building supply chains and enabling end user companies to trial such new technology is key to kick-starting new markets for this technology. We have developed a flexible electronics platform that is highly compatible with existing FPD infrastructure, to produce highly flexible, light-weight and unbreakable displays and sensor arrays. We will discuss the economic breakthrough of this approach, and the business opportunities that this creates for a new generation of electronics.

Biography
Chuck Milligan is CEO of FlexEnable, the leader in flexible electronics technology for wearables and sensors. Chuck has over 20 years' commercial and general management experience across the globe in the semiconductor, consumer electronics, communications, industrial and aerospace markets.
Most recently, Chuck served as CEO of EM Test, the leading conducted EMC test equipment company, successfully completing its sale to AMETEK in 2011.
Prior to this, Chuck was CEO of Finnish/Swiss firm Heptagon micro-optics, which he grew from a 16-employee, pre-revenue company, to an industry-leading business, with 300 employees and a Singapore-based volume production facility - working with leading mobile handset companies such as Nokia and Apple. Raising $70m from venture capital and strategic investors, Chuck was able to achieve this growth over a six-year period.
Chuck also served as Vice President of Industrial & Defense Solutions for Bookham Inc., a leading international optical components manufacturer. Chuck was Commercial Director at JDS Uniphase/Nortel Networks GaAs semiconductor fab in Zurich, Switzerland prior to Bookham's acquisition of the company.
American-born, Chuck moved to Switzerland 20 years ago to establish a Europe/Africa sales office for Harris RF Communications. He speaks English, French and German.

14:00
Organic solar films - a novel and truly urban-fit source of energy
  Thomas Bickl, VP Sales & Product Development, Heliatek GmbH
Organic solar films - a novel and truly urban-fit source of energy
Thomas Bickl

Thomas Bickl
VP Sales & Product Development
Heliatek GmbH

Abstract
Nowadays standard solar technology has reached a cost level, which allows competitive power generation. Amongst other reasons one way to reach that cost level has been the standardization into similar module sizes and optical appearances with little flexibility for adaptation.

The speech will present a novel flexible approach based on a organic solar film.

The solar film invented by Heliatek is based on nano-sized carbon molecules which are deposited in a unique roll-to-roll process onto a flexible PET film substrate. This film weighs only 500 grams/m², and can be tailored in many different ways for length and color. Special versions of the film will also feature a transparency level of up to 50%.

That special combination of material properties is further complemented by the fact that the organic solar film harvests about 25% more energy from the solar spectrum than standard crystalline solar cells. The reason for that lies in the unique material properties of carbon absorber molecules which perform extremely well under hot temperatures or overcast sky conditions, which e.g. are very prevalent in tropical regions. This additional energy harvesting factor comes on top of the world record efficiency for organic solar cells of 12%, which Heliatek has demonstrated.

It will be further shown that the production conditions for Heliafilm® are such that the energy payback time is at record low of less than 3 months and does not contain any hazardous or rare elements - a fact, which is important for the future mass scalability and life cycle analysis.

In conclusion we will present the various ways in which this solar film can be integrated into buildings materials like glass, concrete, steel or polycarbonate on a variety of locations in Europe and Asia.

Biography
Dr. Thomas Bickl

Dr. Thomas Bickl studied physics in Munich, Austin (TX, USA) and Hamburg. In 1994, he obtained the PhD degree from the University of Würzburg for a thesis on "Nanostructuring of III/V semiconductors".

He brings about twenty years experience in sales, business and product development of international high-technology companies in the markets of semiconductor equipment, industrial digital printing and solar technology.

In the solar sector he gained professional expertise in the area of building integrated photovoltaic (BIPV) and developing of international markets and applications.

He joined Heliatek in May 2014, and is responsible for Sales, Marketing and Product Development.

14:25
Opportunities for additive manufacturing and printed electronic within Robert Bosch
  Andreas Schaller, Senior Expert, Robert Bosch GmbH
Opportunities for additive manufacturing and printed electronic within Robert Bosch
Andreas Schaller

Andreas Schaller
Senior Expert
Robert Bosch GmbH

Abstract
Additive manufacturing has already a large share in the production processes of automotive engine control units. Due to the increasing requirements in power dissipation and devices tightness more and more, non-heat curing, paste dispensing and ink printing processes are implemented on the factory floor. Additionally for realizing new electronic functionalities processes like screen-printing and ink-jetting are, historically, in use for component and substrate manufacturing.
Nowadays, driven by IOT AIT trends, such as flexible electronics, harsh environment and wireless sensors, new technological approaches are needed to integrate the customer required electronic functionality. On the way to a connected car new interaction concepts push the market for innovative user interfaces, e.g. "printed" gesture recognition. In the fields of consumer packaging heterogeneous integration technologies on flexible substrates are necessary. With a product portfolio of processing and packaging technology for the food, pharmaceutical, and confectionery industry, this could one relevant trend for Bosch Packaging Technology.
The IOT targets the development of innovative electronic packaging technologies for individualization of mass products, especially sensor nodes in the key application fields like Smart Production and Smart Society. Combining flexible electronics and additive manufacturing enables the development of in principle - generic, highly reliable, complex systems but with the possibility of individualization by 3D-printing of the housings. Leverage additive manufacturing and printing technology will allow to increase the number and types of sensors as well as increasing the number of devices the sensor nodes can be easily integrated.

Biography
Dr. Andreas Schaller joined Robert Bosch's Automotive Electronics Division in 2011, currently acting as Senior Expert at the Robert Bosch Center of Competence "Connectivity". In 2009 he founded ASC - Technology Consulting to support the European businesses on the Internet of Things and joined OE-A. He previously worked for Motorola Labs, Germany, managing the Motorola Labs research area 'Short Range RF Communications' in Europe

14:50
Hybrid printed electronics: 2D manufacturing for freeform 3D application
  Marc Koetse, Senior Researcher, Holst Centre / TNO
Hybrid printed electronics: 2D manufacturing for freeform 3D application
Marc Koetse

Marc Koetse
Senior Researcher
Holst Centre / TNO

Abstract
Electronics today are becoming more and more ubiquitous. This leads to ever greater challenges in design, engineering and manufacturing of the electronic modules. For instance electronic devices may be worn on the body in health patches, be integrated in textiles or be used in car interiors. In generic term: the electronics needs to be applied in a 3D environment, must be stretchable or at least conformable. At the same time modern electronics manufacturing lines are completely equipped for 2D fabrication on boards, sheets or rolls.
Hybrid printed electronics (HPE), the combination of printed conductive tracks on cheap foils and classic microelectronics, seems very well suited to overcome the gap between 2D manufacturing and 3D application. In recent years, our research and developments have mainly focused on the improvement of existing technologies in order to improve the TRL level but also the complexity of the demonstrators.
For instance, In the field of printing, mayor improvements were made that allow for the realization of a circuit with 5 conductive layers. Another important improvement was realized in the reliability of placed components for application in wearable devices again the technology could be transferred to an external party. This, together with much improved design rules have allowed us to make highly demanding yet appealing demonstrators.
In our contribution we will discuss these topics and will show how the improved technologies helped to solve the specific demands and requirements of our customers. At the same time many of the developed solutions proved to be highly generic and are applicable in wide variety op applications where freeform electronics are desired.

Biography
Dr. Marc Koetse received his PhD in polymer chemistry and material science from the Université Catholique de Louvain (B) in 2001. After a few years at TNO, where worked on organic PV, he joined the Holst Centre in 2005 to start a group on "Interconnect Technologies". In 2007 he moved to the Sensor Tags and Systems program where he is responsible for the integration of organic electronics and Si-based devices and technologies in sensor platforms. Currently he is senior researcher in the integration technologies for flexible systems group.

15:15 Coffee Break
Session

Business Cases 2

Chair Luigi Occhipinti, Outreach and Business Development Manager, Univ. of Cambridge / EPSRC Centre for Innovative Manufacturing in Large-Area Electronics
Luigi Occhipinti

Luigi Occhipinti
Outreach and Business Development Manager
Univ. of Cambridge / EPSRC Centre for Innovative Manufacturing in Large-Area Electronics

Biography
Dr. Luigi Occhipinti joined the University of Cambridge in April 2014, as Outreach Manager of the EPSRC Center of Innovative Manufacturing for Large Area Electronics, and Business Development Manager of the Cambridge Innovation and Knowledge Centre (CIKC).
He has 20 years of experience driving research and innovation in the global semiconductor industry, pioneering the field of post-silicon technologies, organic and printed electronics, carbon nanotubes and graphene-based flexible electronics, smart systems heterogeneous integration and sensors.
Prior to joining the University of Cambridge, he was R&D Senior Group Manager and Programs Director for Flexible and Disposable Electronics at STMicroelectronics, leading research teams in Italy, France and Singapore and company initiatives for new business development based on Heterogeneous Integration, Flexible and Disposable Electronics, MEMS-based sensors and diagnostic bio-systems.
Luigi has an Electronic Engineering degree and a PhD in Electrical Engineering. He has authored and co-authored over 80 scientific publications and 35 patents.
For more than a decade, Luigi has been an active and recognised expert in the field of OLAE (Organic and Large-Area Electronics) and innovative manufacturing techniques, acting as Project Coordinator and Principal Investigator of more than 12 EC funded programs, under Framework Programme 6 and FP7, in the areas of ICT (Information and Communication Technologies) and NMP (Nanosciences, Nanotechnologies, Materials, and new Production Technologies), and member of 2 IEEE (P1620, P1620.1) and 3 IEC standardization technical committees (TC105, TC111, TC113).

16:00
Tailoring Printed Primary Batteries for Various Kinds of Applications
  Andreas Willert, Senior Scientist, Fraunhofer ENAS
Tailoring Printed Primary Batteries for Various Kinds of Applications
Andreas Willert

Andreas Willert
Senior Scientist
Fraunhofer ENAS

Abstract
Printed batteries are almost known for two decades although only a very small number of applications made it to the market that are powered by this type of energy storage devices. The approach of this implementation of electrochemical energy is reasonable: employment of printing technology to deposit the demanded amounts of battery materials delivering exactly that amount of energy for the application that is required during its lifetime. Additionally this type of battery has unique features like bendability or a very thin encapsulation.
In this presentation an overview is given about approaches to customize electrical power according to applications' requirements. Achievements are presented as well as implications deducted. E.g. our approach is to design the battery consequently according to the boundary conditions of the application. I.e. to arrange areas for different components of the application rather than to design the application around any type of standardized battery. Following this approach applications like LED demonstrators or the power supply of a sensor device are presented.

Biography
Dr. Andreas Willert is deputy head of the department Printed Functionalities at the Fraunhofer Institute for Electronics Nano Systems ENAS in Chemnitz, Germany, since 2007. Since 2003 he has studied various processes related to printing processes. Since 12 years he is giving lectures about printing technologies and their applications. He graduated from the Kiel University in Physics and holds a PhD in Physics from the Technische Universität Chemnitz. He is involved in R&D aiming in manufacturing of functionalities employing printing technologies. Further topics are printed large area electronics, the digital manufacturing of smart objects and the industrialization of these activities.

16:25 TBA
  Brian Cobb, Product Manager, PragmatIC Printing Ltd
16:50
Metering Encapsulation and Barriers: A Key Challenge for Market and Technology Development
  John Fahlteich, Senior Scientist / Project Manager, Fraunhofer Institute for Organic Electronics, Electron Beam and Plasma Technology
Metering Encapsulation and Barriers: A Key Challenge for Market and Technology Development
John Fahlteich

John Fahlteich
Senior Scientist / Project Manager
Fraunhofer Institute for Organic Electronics, Electron Beam and Plasma Technology

Abstract
Encapsulation and ultra-high permeation barrier films are one critical component for the market entry of flexible organic and printed electronic devices. First high performing barrier film products entered the marked within the last years. However, the difficulties in comparing the performance of different barrier films and translating device's requirements into measurable quantities for permeation barriers have been identified as key challenges for a broader market penetration of these products in large area organic electronic encapsulation.
The first step is to compare the barrier performance (mostly represented by the water vapor transmission rate) of different barrier films. While several highly sensitive WVTR-measurement techniques are described in the literature, their accuracy and comparability has only been tested recently in a systematic way. With a growing body of literature referring to different coating and barrier technologies, it is challenging to gather a coherent picture both of the performance of the materials studied and the permeation measurement methods used. We report on independent WVTR measurements of the same batch of a high performance barrier film under two sets of conditions in several laboratories with different state-of the-art methods. These methods also include several calcium test set-ups. The results showed that, while some differences are present, there is a remarkable level of agreement between the measurement methods.
In the second step, we report on key properties of permeation barrier and encapsulation systems in relationship to the requirements of the organic electronic devices as well as their application cases and application conditions discussing ideas for translating device requirements into measurable quantities of the encapsulation product.

Biography
John Fahlteich was born in 1981 in Lutherstadt Wittenberg, Germany. He graduated from the University of Leipzig with a diploma in physics in 2005. After that he worked as PhD student and scientist at the Fraunhofer Institute for Electron Beam and Plasma Technology, Dresden. In 2010, John earned a PhD from the Technical University of Chemnitz with a thesis about a detailed characterization of vacuum deposited permeation barrier layers. In total, he has now over 10 years of experience in the field of thin film technology, vacuum deposition techniques, permeation barriers and encapsulation of flexible electronics. Since 2010, John has been working as project manager and expert for permeation barriers at Fraunhofer Institute for Organic Electronics, Electron Beam and Plasma Technology FEP. Up to today he published over 35 papers, conference contributions and patents as well as one book chapter in the field. Since 2012, he represents the Fraunhofer FEP as leading member in several organizations dealing with flexible electronics encapsulation such as the Organic-Electronics Association (OE-A) and the Flexible Electronics Encapsulation Technologies (FLEET) Cluster in Dresden, Germany.

17:15
Barriers to Progress
  David Bird, Principal Scientist, CPI
Barriers to Progress
David Bird

David Bird
Principal Scientist
CPI

Abstract
The use of organic electronic materials, combined with the desire to produce lightweight & low cost flexible devices, raises the need to develop a commercially viable technology which limits the impact of the organic material's intrinsic environmental instability.
CPI has been involved in the area of barrier film and encapsulation development for many years and with its recent acquisition of a roll-to-roll Atomic Layer Deposition capability is actively engaging with the industry to meet this technology need. This presentation reviews the existing technologies highlights the barrier and associated metrology technologies being developed at CPI's National Printable Electronics Facility.
The challenges of testing an ultra-barrier material over large areas are significant, as are identifying defects of significant size; holes or coating defects in an optically transparent, <100 nm thick layer are difficult to find and measure without making a functional device, taking days, then testing it with accelerated ageing, which can take weeks. Data from the EU-FP7 projects NanoMend and R2R-CIGS documents the developments from a temporal-ALD batch process to a roll-to-roll spatial-ALD process.
The aim of this work is to reduce costs and improve the manufacturability of these materials for a commercial/industrial environment.

Biography
Dr David Bird has 11 years experience working with film substrates and barrier materials. David completed an Engineering Doctorate in 2008 sponsored by DuPont Teijin Films on nano-scale coatings on films for flexible electronics. Joining CPI in 2008, he is now a Principal Scientist at the UK's National Printable Electronics Centre, focussing on vacuum-deposition of barrier materials. In 7 years at CPI David has 23 IP submissions (for Patent, Publication or internal Know-how), 17 of which relate to Barrier Materials and their integration to functional devices.

17:40

Keynote

 
Commercialization of Printed Electronics looks for ecosystems - case Printocent
  Ilkka Kaisto, PrintoCent, Director, VTT Technical Research Centre
Commercialization of Printed Electronics looks for ecosystems - case Printocent
Ilkka Kaisto

Ilkka Kaisto
PrintoCent, Director
VTT Technical Research Centre

Abstract
The challenges to get the Printed Electronics to fly are still in developing maturity levels of both design & development processes and available manufacturing processes, which could form the running ecosystems for products utilizing the technologies of Printed Electronics. The design & development processes are looking for engineering design tools to enable the product design and simulations already used in printed circuit electronics and the parameters of the available manufacturing processes. Referring to the key findings in EUFP7 COLAE project focusing on commercialization of Organic and Large Area (OLAE) electronics, the knowledge of OLAE technologies is still in low level in the interviewed companies and the investment attitude to feasibility studies and prototyping is still in `waiting mode`, so the flow of designing and prototyping of these technologies to next generation products of companies is thin. This is partly due to fact that only a few persons in industry - designers and engineers - are familiar with OLAE technologies and due to fact that industrialization with available proven value chains to meet quality systems of specific business areas are also very few. So we are still missing in many potential product cases the ecosystems for Printed Electronics. These findings were based on interviewing 60 companies having a potential product idea that could utilize Printed Electronics.

Biography
Mr. Ilkka Kaisto received his his MSc and Tech.Lic. degrees in electronics and optoelectronics engineering from the University of Oulu, Finland, in 1981 and 1987, respectively. He has been working is SME companies (Prometrics Oy, Polarpro Oy, A.M.S: Accuracy Management Services Ltd) as an entrepreneur and in Insta Oy (Instrumentointi Oy, Insta Visual Solutions) in various positions from R&D management to business and quality manager to Vice President 1984 - 2005. Since then he worked in Oulu region as a regional developer in Micro- and nanotechnology clustering (Micropolis Ltd) and started the PrintoCent initiative with VTT year 2008. At beginning of 2011 he started to work at VTT as Director of PrintoCent. He coordinated the EU-FP7 COLAE-project 2011-2014 with 17 leading European partners in Organic and Large Area Electronics.

18:10 Networking Reception
Wednesday, October 7, 2015
Session

Manufacturing 1

Chair Andreas Toennis, CTO, Aixtron SE
Andreas Toennis

Andreas Toennis
CTO
Aixtron SE

Biography
Andreas Tönnis joined AIXTRON in 2012 as Chief Technology Officer responsible for Product development later on adding Product Marketing. Since late 2014 he took over the responsibility for the New Technology business including OLED material deposition, Thin-Film Encapsulation and CNT/Graphene deposition solutions in addition to his corporate charter as CTO.
Andreas came to Aixtron from the Silicon Valley where between 2001 and 2012 he held various executive management Functions at Mattson Technology Inc. including business responsibility for the Thermal Products Group. Prior to joining Mattson, between 1992 and 2001, he held different operational management responsibilities within Steag Electronic Systems in Germany and Austin, TX in the US. Andreas was awarded an MS degree in Chemical Engineering from University of Karlsruhe (KTI) and has gone through executive educational programs at Stanford Business School and USW in Germany.

09:00

Keynote

 
Unlocking opportunities for inorganic semiconductors with micro assembly: new form factors, new cost structures, new applications
  Christopher Bower, Chief Technology Officer, X-Celeprint Inc.
Unlocking opportunities for inorganic semiconductors with micro assembly: new form factors, new cost structures, new applications
Christopher Bower

Christopher Bower
Chief Technology Officer
X-Celeprint Inc.

Abstract
Integrating ultra-miniaturized inorganic semiconductor devices onto non-native substrates enables new kinds of products with desirable functionalities and cost structures that are inaccessible by conventional means. Micro assembly technologies are the practical ways to make such micro-scale combinations possible. Micro transfer printing technology (µTP) is a widely-demonstrated form of micro assembly, having demonstrated applicability in optical communications, magnetic storage, photovoltaics, bio-integrated electronics, and displays. The common value proposition of µTP in all of these applications is to provide a product that uses the most advantageous semiconductor devices and has the most desirable form factor. Those characteristics provide cost benefits, performance metrics, or combinations of properties that are inaccessible or impractical without µTP.

Biography
Dr. Christopher (Chris) A. Bower is the Chief Technology Officer at X-Celeprint Limited, a company founded to develop and commercialize advanced micro assembly technologies. He was formerly a Technical Manager at Semprius, Inc., where he led the team responsible for micro-transfer-printing and wafer-level-packaging of advanced microscale solar cells. His past experience includes three years of research and development on three-dimensionally integrated circuits at RTI International and four years of research on nanotechnology and photonics devices at Bell Labs and InPlane Photonics, Inc. Chris received a Ph.D. degree in physics from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, in 2000, where his graduate studies focused on the synthesis and novel properties of carbon nanotubes. His interests include three-dimensional integration of integrated circuits, heterogeneous integration of compound semiconductors onto non-native substrates and the fabrication of low-cost, large-format electronics using novel assembly methods.

09:30
ORGANIC ELECTRONIC AND PRINTED SMART SYSTEMS ON STEEL
  Philippe Guaino, Project Leader, CRM group - AC&CS
ORGANIC ELECTRONIC AND PRINTED SMART SYSTEMS ON STEEL
Philippe Guaino

Philippe Guaino
Project Leader
CRM group - AC&CS

Abstract
Most of organic and smart devices are printed on plastic foils, papers, and more recently on thin glass "foils". Although such material are the most conventional substrates to fabricate smart system, difficulties can arise due to the shortcomings durability, moisture barrier properties (particularly for organic material) and heat dissipation. Metallic material as substrate foils appears to be a promising alternative for a possible future generation of printed electronic devices. This approach is new in both metallurgy and electronic world.
Since several years, CRM group (previoulsy ArcelorMittal Research Laboratory) has developed a new advanced steel substrate dedicated to organic and more generally flexible or conformable electronic devices. Metal will be flexible, rigid, or even formable devices. Steel has very good oxygen and water barrier properties. It is an electrical and thermal conductor, which can greatly improve the lifetime of the device thanks to heat dissipation. Indeed, such substrates can be very helpful for integrated system in "extreme" environment (pressure, temperature conditions and so on). Moreover, smart steel systems can be manufactured in a roll to roll process, which is the key of a low cost, competitive process and compatible with flexible electronic manufacturing.


During this presentation, advanced steel material manufacturing for smart system devices will be outlined, dedicated to large area device integration. Special focus will be treated on steel surface treatment to reach exigent physical properties (roughness, planarization, dielectric and conductive materials) and low cost manufacturing process. At last, we will show how back side steel surface can be exploited and dedicated to the integration of a "printed circuit board " and interconnected with front side coating devices

Biography
Philippe Guaino studied solid-state physics at the Faculty of Sciences and Techniques at Saint-Jérôme University, Marseille. In 2001, he obtained his PhD thesis. From 2001 to 2006, he was post-doc researcher in surface science at 'National Center for Sensor Research' in Dublin, Ireland, and other institutes in France. Since 2006, he has obtained a permanent position at ArcelorMittal research center, now CRM group, in Belgium. He is responsible of the smart coating activities and printing electronic process on steel.

09:55
In-line Spectroscopic Ellipsometry and Raman Spectroscopy as powerful quality control tools for roll-to-roll manufacturing of Organic Electronics
  Argiris Laskarakis, Head of Organic Electronics Group, Lab for Thin Films, Nanosystems & Nanometrology (LTFN), Department of Physics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki
In-line Spectroscopic Ellipsometry and Raman Spectroscopy as powerful quality control tools for roll-to-roll manufacturing of Organic Electronics
Argiris Laskarakis

Argiris Laskarakis
Head of Organic Electronics Group
Lab for Thin Films, Nanosystems & Nanometrology (LTFN), Department of Physics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki

Abstract
Roll-to-roll (r2r) manufacturing processes offer clear advantages for the low-cost and large area production of several Organic Electronic devices on flexible substrates, such as Organic Photovoltaics (OPVs). One of the main factors that contribute to the achievement of high efficiency of OPVs is the optimization of the blend morphology of the photoactive layer, which consists of a polymer electron donor and a fullerene-based electron acceptor. Also, the optimization of the quality of the OPV printed nanomaterials (organic semiconductors, transparent electrodes, barrier nano-layers etc.) is a prerequisite for the achievement of the required performance, efficiency and lifetime of OPVs that will enable their wide market exploitation.

In this work, we present an innovative methodology for the in-line quality control of r2r print-ed OPV nanomaterials by the adaptation of robust optical methods such as in-line Spectroscopic Ellipsometry and Raman Spectroscopy on a r2r printing pilot line for the manufacturing of Organic Electronic devices. These optical techniques are combined with sophisticated mod-elling procedures and methodologies in order to obtain significant information on the optical properties of bulk heterojunction (BHJ) photoactive layers for OPVs that consist of state-of-the-art electron donors (e.g. polythiophenes) and acceptors (e.g. fullerene derivatives, PC60BM, PC70BM, ICBA, etc.). This innovative methodology establishes the importance and applicability of optical tools to be used as standard tools for the in-line robust determination of the thickness, optical and structural properties and the quality of other thin films and nanolayers for many Organic and Printed Electronics applications.

Biography
Dr. Argiris Laskarakis is the Head of the Organic Electronics Group of the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece.
He is specialist in the fabrication and characterization of Organic Electronics nanomaterials. He has many years xperience on the optical characterization and modelling of the optical properties of inorganic, organic and hybrid nanostructured materials by Spectroscopic Ellipsometry in an extended spectral region from the IR to Vis-fUV, and Raman Spectroscopy. He is specialist in thin film deposition with various PVD (e.g. e-beam evaporation and magnetron sputtering), CVD techniques, and plasma treatment of bulk materials and thin films. He is experienced in the modelling of the optical properties of bulk materials and nanostructured thin films, and in theoretical investigations & modelling of optical properties of anisotropic materials by Mueller Matrix methodologies.

10:20 Coffee Break
10:50
Photonic processes in printed electronics
  Merijn P. Giesbers, Research Engineer, Holst Centre / TNO
Photonic processes in printed electronics
Merijn P. Giesbers

Merijn P. Giesbers
Research Engineer
Holst Centre / TNO

Abstract
In this presentation photonic-based patterning and sintering processes for printed electronics will be introduced and their advantages and challenges compared to conventional techniques will be discussed. Firstly, Laser Induced Forward Transfer (LIFT) will be considered. LIFT is a technique which uses a laser pulse to transfer material from a donor layer to an acceptor substrate. It is a promising technology providing flexible, high resolution and fast printing, capable of handling a wide range of materials, and enabling printing on a wide range of substrates, including conformal surfaces. An overview of our results regarding the printing of silver inks, conductive adhesives and dielectric materials will be given. In particular, fine (15 µm) silver lines, printed dots of highly viscous adhesives and bridging using dielectric materials. Secondly, photonic flash sintering will be discussed. By exposing printed metal ink structures to intense short light pulses, drying and sintering of metal particle inks can be achieved yielding highly conductive structures. Since the heating by light is localized in time and space, sintering of the metal at high temperatures can be achieved much faster while keeping the supporting (often heat sensitive) foils cool. The given talk will provide an overview of our progress on developing a Roll-to-Roll system capable of patterning and sintering multilayer stacks, consisting of electroluminescent materials, insulators and metallic conductors, thereby covering a wide range of applications, such as printed sensor platforms, RFID tags and electroluminescent devices. Functional materials are deposited and patterned on flexible substrates by rotary screen and inkjet printing at web speeds of up to 20 m/min. Post-deposition treatment of the deposited materials (drying, curing and sintering) is carried out by a combination of near-infrared and photonic flash treatment, allowing much higher manufacturing speeds compared to traditional approaches.

Biography
Merijn Giesbers is a Research Engineer at Holst Centre, an open innovation centre in the Netherlands. He studied physics at the Radboud University in Nijmegen. He has worked on research into Laser Induced Forward Transfer for the past 4 years, in close collaboration with industrial partners.

11:15
OLED lighting using ultra-thin flexible glass
  Stefan Mogck, Department Manager, Fraunhofer FEP
OLED lighting using ultra-thin flexible glass
Stefan Mogck

Stefan Mogck
Department Manager
Fraunhofer FEP

Abstract
Ultra-thin flexible glass appears as a highly attractive substrate and encapsulation material for OLED lighting. Properties like high moisture barrier, high temperature resistance and high surface quality are the main reasons for that. Fraunhofer FEP is working on ultra-thin flexible glass using sheet-to-sheet and roll-to-roll processes as well, Ultra-thin glass with thickness of 50 µm and 100 µm is suitable to wind through the roll-to-roll OLED line at Fraunhofer FEP which consists of a vacuum coater for small molecule depositions, a roll-to-roll encapsulation under inert atmosphere and an optical inspection system for defect characterization. For the minimization of glass breakage the ultra-thin glass is laminated on a host PET film to increase the robustness during the roll-to-roll process. In general, this glass PET laminates supports the tool enhancement to find proper web tensions and critical bending radii for winding pure ultra-thin glass in the future. At present, a challenge is to minimize the residual water in films for OLED substrates on roll materials. Especially, a lot of efforts have been started to dry in Roll-to-Roll polymer based barrier films. Low water content in ultra-thin glass will be expected that an extensive roll-to-roll drying process can be avoided. Additionally, high process temperature above 200 °C can be applied on ultra-thin glass to remove residual water from the surface or coating of highly conductive ITO for homogenous large area OLED light illuminations.
In this paper the OLED manufacturing on flexible ultra-thin glass will be outlined of efficient OLED devices with bottom emitting or transparent designs. A challenge of the roll-to-roll process and electrical connectivity on ultra-thin glass will be discussed in correlation with obtained OLED lifetime. Finally, the Roll-to-Roll processed OLED devices will be compared with sheet based OLED devices on ultra-thin glass regarding lifetime and power efficacy.

Biography
Dr. Stefan Mogck, studied physics at the University of Tübingen, Germany in 2000. In 2004 he received his PhD at the Institute of Applied Physics (Materials science and engineering) of the University of Groningen (NL). Afterwards, he joined to Advanced Micro Devices in Dresden as a defect engineer. In 2007 he was engaged at MicroEmissive Displays (MED) in Dresden as process engineer for the sputtering and the PLED spin coat process. Since 2008 he moved to Fraunhofer Institute for Photonic Microsystems. He is now leading the department "Roll-to-Roll Organic Technology".

11:40
Ultra-fast laser patterning for roll-to-roll manufacturing of organic photovoltaics onto flexible substrates
  Stergios Logothetidis, Professor of Physics, Lab for Thin Films, Nanosystems & Nanometrology (LTFN), Department of Physics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki
Ultra-fast laser patterning for roll-to-roll manufacturing of organic photovoltaics onto flexible substrates
Stergios Logothetidis

Stergios Logothetidis
Professor of Physics
Lab for Thin Films, Nanosystems & Nanometrology (LTFN), Department of Physics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki

Abstract
Ultra-fast laser processes are attractive as alternative patterning techniques to photolithographic methods that have the advantage for implementation to roll-to-roll (r2r) manufacturing processes for the low-cost and large area production of numerous flexible Organic Electronic devices, such as Organic Photovoltaics (OPVs). Laser processes offer greater resolution than printing methods, whereas the incorporation of laser scribing allows closer spacing of the P1, P2 P3 laser scribes, increasing the active area of the printed OPV device, which contribute to the increase of the OPV efficiency.

In this work, we present the latest results on the implementation of in-line laser scribing meth-od on a r2r pilot line for the ultra-fast laser scribing of inorganic and organic nanomaterials for flexible OPVs. These include state-of-the-art inorganic nanomaterials (e.g. Indium Tin Oxide), as well as transparent polymers (e.g. PEDOT:PSS) and photoactive polymers as electron donors (e.g. polythiophenes) and acceptors (e.g. fullerene derivatives, PCBM, etc.) in single and multilayer structures. This innovative methodology demonstrates the potentiality of ultra-fast laser processes to be used as a standard process step for r2r manufacturing processes for Organic and Printed Electronics devices.

Biography
Prof. Stergios Logothetidis is the Founder and Director of the Lab of Thin Films - Nanosystems & Nanometrology (LTFN, www.ltfn.gr) and the Center of Organic & Printed Electronics, at Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece (AUTh). His research activity is complemented by over 880 papers and review articles in international journals & conferences. He has given more than 150 invited talks. He is a referee in more than 25 scientific journals and on the board of several journals. He is the editor of several books with topics ranging from Nanotechnologies, Nanomedicine to Organic Electronics. He has been the coordinator and principal investigator in more than 70 R&D projects funded by European Commission in the fields of Nanotechnologies, Materials Science, Organic Electronics and Nanomedicine. He is the director and founder of the Post-Graduate Program "Nanosciences & Nanotechnologies" of Aristotle University, with the participation of Depts. of Physics, Chemistry, Medicine and Polytechnic School in 2002, and other Depts and Institutes from Greece and abroad. He is the founder and Coordinator of the Thematic Research Network on Nanotechnologies and Nanobiotechnologies "NANONET" with more than 370 members (of Laboratories, Research Centers and companies) from all over the world, established in 2003. Finally, he annually organizes a platform of events since 2004 with two International Conferences, three International Summer Schools and one Exhibition) on Nanotechnologies, Nanomedicine & Organic Electronics under the umbrella of NANOTEXNOLOGY (www.nanotexnology.com). He is founder and responsible of the Hellenic Organic and Printed Electronic Association (HOPE-A) (www.hope-a.com) that consists of more than 20 companies and 3 research institutes for the formation of the Organic Electronics Industry in Greece.

12:05 Panel discussion

Wearable electronics : how to increase the market?

Moderation Markus Strecker, CEO, Teiimo
Markus Strecker

Markus Strecker
CEO
Teiimo

Biography
Markus Strecker is the CEO and founder of Teiimo. Teiimo is a technology company specialized in the field of conformable electronics. It creates its own innovative and high quality products, develops systems and components from concept to series production, and takes care of the system integration.

In 2014 Teiimo introduced its first product: the iilation Jacket, a fashionable luxury leather jacket that heats the shoulders, back, neck, kidneys, serves as a Bluetooth hands free calling device, plays music, and offers cell phone charging capability. The iilation Jacket is a perfect example for the power of conformable electronics and sets new standards in integration level and functional density for smart garments.

Mr. Strecker is an international executive and a renowned expert in wearable electronics and product development. He is an experienced manager in big corporations, as well as in start-up environments.

As one of the pioneers in the wearable technologies market, ten years ago Mr. Strecker developed "the Hub" the first mass produced wearable electronics jacket for O'Neill. It was the first communication and entertainment jacket worldwide. Many more iconic products for different brands followed under his technical lead. For example the MP3Blue by Rosner, the Zegna Energy harvesting jacket, as well as the "KnowWhere" jacket, which was a technology demonstrator.
Before starting Teiimo Mr. Strecker was Director for Electrical Engineering at adidas where he lead the concept and electronics development of the miCoach Elite Team System, the most comprehensive and technically advanced training system for professional soccer teams, which is used for example by the German National Team, numerous professional soccer teams in Europe and the complete Major League Soccer in the US.

Mr. Strecker is listed as a technology expert for the European Commission. He has a broad international background having worked in Europe, Asia, and North-America.

Panelists
  • Karlheinz Bock, director of the Institute for Electronics Packaging (IAVT), TU Dresden
  • Karlheinz Bock

    Karlheinz Bock
    director of the Institute for Electronics Packaging (IAVT)
    TU Dresden

    Biography
    Karlheinz Bock studied electronics and communication engineering at the University of
    Saarbrücken, Germany. In 1994 he achieved the Dr. Ing. degree in RF microelectronics from the
    University of Darmstadt, Germany. Since January 2001 he is with the Fraunhofer Institute for
    Reliability and Microintegration IZM in Munich (since 2010 renamed Fraunhofer Research Institution
    for Modular Solid State Technologies EMFT), Germany, as head of the Polytronic and Multi
    Functional Systems department working on the development of thin and flexible systems and
    technologies as well as chemical and biological sensors and bio analytical systems. Since March 2008
    until September 2014 he also served as professor of Polytronic Microsystems at the University of
    Berlin (TU Berlin). He received in 2012 the Dr. h. c. from Polytechnical University of Bukarest in
    Romania. Since October 2014 he serves as professor of electronics packaging and director of the
    Institute for Electronics Packaging (IAVT) at the University of Dresden (TU Dresden).

  • Mike Ciesinski, President and CEO, FlexTech Alliance
  • Mike Ciesinski

    Mike Ciesinski
    President and CEO
    FlexTech Alliance

    Biography
    Michael Ciesinski is president and chief executive officer of the FlexTech Alliance (www.flextech.org). FlexTech is a R&D consortium and trade association chartered with building the infrastructure for flexible electronics manufacturing. FlexTech sponsors and conducts a multi-million dollar technology development program, as well as providing the industry with technical, financial and market information.

    Ciesinski's prior executive positions include vice-president and director of North American Operations for Semiconductor Equipment and Materials International (SEMI), an international trade association in San Jose, CA. Prior to joining SEMI, Ciesinski was appointed as Director, New York State Labor-Management Committee.

    Under Ciesinski's direction, FlexTech has completed 150+ R&D projects and coordinated more than $170M in federal R&D directed to the flat panel display (FPD) and flexible electronics supply chain. Industry cost-share funds have contributed an additional $200M of the total FlexTech R&D program. In February 2012, FlexTech created and now manages the Nano-Bio Manufacturing Consortium (www.nbmc.org). In August 2015, FlexTech was awarded a $75M U.S. Government grant to form and manage a Flexible Hybrid Electronics Manufacturing Innovation Institute (www.fhemii.com).

    In addition to directing an aggressive R&D program, FlexTech sponsors capital investment forums with participation from small and mid-cap companies and start-up firms. FlexTech's industry workshops and conferences set the standard for information and technology exchanges within the flexible electronics community.
    Michael Ciesinski is a graduate of the State University of New York at Albany. He is a member of the Board of Directors of FlexTech Alliance and a member of the Dean's Advisory Council (Engineering) at the California Polytechnic State University at San Luis Obispo.

  • Chuck Milligan, CEO, FlexEnable Ltd.
  • Chuck Milligan

    Chuck Milligan
    CEO
    FlexEnable Ltd.

    Biography
    Chuck Milligan is CEO of FlexEnable, the leader in flexible electronics technology for wearables and sensors. Chuck has over 20 years' commercial and general management experience across the globe in the semiconductor, consumer electronics, communications, industrial and aerospace markets.
    Most recently, Chuck served as CEO of EM Test, the leading conducted EMC test equipment company, successfully completing its sale to AMETEK in 2011.
    Prior to this, Chuck was CEO of Finnish/Swiss firm Heptagon micro-optics, which he grew from a 16-employee, pre-revenue company, to an industry-leading business, with 300 employees and a Singapore-based volume production facility - working with leading mobile handset companies such as Nokia and Apple. Raising $70m from venture capital and strategic investors, Chuck was able to achieve this growth over a six-year period.
    Chuck also served as Vice President of Industrial & Defense Solutions for Bookham Inc., a leading international optical components manufacturer. Chuck was Commercial Director at JDS Uniphase/Nortel Networks GaAs semiconductor fab in Zurich, Switzerland prior to Bookham's acquisition of the company.
    American-born, Chuck moved to Switzerland 20 years ago to establish a Europe/Africa sales office for Harris RF Communications. He speaks English, French and German.

13:05 Lunch
Session

Manufacturing 2

Chair Jerome Gavillet, European program Manager, COMMISSARIAT A L'ENERGIE ATOMIQUE (CEA)
Jerome Gavillet

Jerome Gavillet
European program Manager
COMMISSARIAT A L'ENERGIE ATOMIQUE (CEA)

Biography
Dr. Jérôme GAVILLET received his PhD on material physics & surface processing from l'Ecole des Mines de Nancy (F) in 1996. As a researcher, he worked on hydrogen embrittlement of stainless steels for the petrol industry at the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (B), on zircaloy alloy coatings for the French nuclear industry and on copper interconnects for the semiconductor industry at the University of York (UK). He spent 7 years in microelectronics working as a process engineer for equipment suppliers in Cardiff (UK), Sunnyvale (US) and Grenoble (F). He joined CEA-Liten in 2005 as a project manager in the field of Renewable Energies and Nanomaterials, working on surface energy and thermal management topics. Since 2012, he works as an European program manager, contributing to the management of CEA-Liten's EU projects portfolio and setting up new business opportunities in the fields of materials, renewable energies, energy efficiency and information & communication technologies. He has authored 10 patents and over 40 publications (H-index=9, August 2015).

14:25
Industrial High Throughput Atomic Layer Deposition Equipment and Process for OLED Encapsulation
  Jacques Kools, CEO, Encapsulix
Industrial High Throughput Atomic Layer Deposition Equipment and Process for OLED Encapsulation
Jacques Kools

Jacques Kools
CEO
Encapsulix

Abstract
Thin film encapsulation is a key enabling technology for OLED devices, in particular for applications such as automotive lighting and flexible displays. Ultrathin films deposited by low temperature Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) have recently gained interest as an attractive approach. In order to enable a viable industrial solution, it is required to deliver low temperature processes (less than 100°C), exceptional barrier performance (WVTR better than 10-5 g/m2/day), high throughput processing (i.e. deposition on large glass substrates with takt times of a few minutes) and acceptable cost of ownership (single digit Euro per m2).
Traditionally, ALD processes have been able to demonstrate barriers of excellent quality. However, the low throughput of these traditional processes has been a limiting factor for their adaptation in high volume manufacturing of OLED devices. The Parallel Precursor Wave (PPW) reactor architecture developed by Encapsulix allows overcoming this barrier, by a significant increase of the deposition rate (factor 20 or more) and reactor size (scaling to meter size).
This innovative reactor technology has now been deployed for OLED manufacturing in the infinityTM series of equipment, which covers substrate sizes from 200x200mm (Infinity M200D) to Gen 2.5 (Infinity M500D) to Gen 4.5 ( Infinity M750D).
In this presentation, we will review industrial solutions for OLED encapsulation for lighting and display application. Items which will be discussed include:
*** The underlying gas injection and wave propagation technology allowing extremely fast pulsing and purging of precursors
*** Process data, including optical , mechanical and barrier performance data
*** Manufacturing data, including uniformity, repeatability, throughput, ..etc

Biography
Jacques Kools studied physics and materials science at Antwerp University (Belgium). From 1986 until 1997, he was a research scientist at Philips Research Labs in the Netherlands, working mostly on surface science and thin film materials. From 1997 through 2004, he worked in the semiconductor equipment industry in California, at CVC and Veeco. Since 2004, he is based in the South of France, on an entrepreneurial track. He founded Encapsulix in 2011.

14:50
COST-EFFICIENT OLED MANUFACTURING ENABLED THROUGH PROPRIETARY PROCESS TECHNOLOGIES OVPD® AND OPTACAP***
  Jürgen Kreis, Director Business Development, AIXTRON SE
COST-EFFICIENT OLED MANUFACTURING ENABLED THROUGH PROPRIETARY PROCESS TECHNOLOGIES OVPD® AND OPTACAP***
Jürgen Kreis

Jürgen Kreis
Director Business Development
AIXTRON SE

Abstract
The ability of OLEDS for conformality, transparency, lightweight, just to name a few, enables applications, where such features are mandatory. Potential fabrication on plastic substrates further increases possibilities.
In comparison to incumbent technologies such as LCDs and LED-based luminaires , OLEDs still are struggling with cost disparities.
Being vulnerable to water and oxygen exposure, OLEDS additionally require barrier systems as part of the device architecture, which adds additional costs.
AIXTRON has developed a number of proprietary technologies which simplify scale-up, increase throughput, and ultimately address lowering manufacturing cost.
Two technologies shall be discussed in the presentation.
Organic Vapor Phase Deposition (OVPD®) utilizes the advantages of an inert carrier-gas for the deposition of organic stacks based on small molecule materials. Originally developed by Prof. S. Forrest at Princeton University, OVPD utilizes inert carrier gas for material deposition.
AIXTRON added its proprietary Close Coupled Showerhead® (CCS) technology and novel source technologies for efficient evaporation. These core components enable precise deposition with excellent thickness uniformity, high material utilization efficiency and throughput. The approach realizes cost advantages by scale of economies.
The second technology to be discussed is about deposition of barrier films.
The proprietary OPTACAP™ process yields SiNx-based thinfilm exhibiting high flexibility and excellent barrier properties at very attractive manufacturing costs. The process yields low surface stress and the respective film shows high flexibility.
OPTACAP™ utilizes a PECVD concept based on linear source technology, which allows for scaling towards large substrate size with sufficient throughput, thus further lowering manufacturing costs of OLEDs.
We will provide an overview about the basic concepts of both technologies. Examples for scaling and shall be discussed.

Biography
Short CV Juergen Kreis

- obtained a master degree in electrical engineering (Dipl.-Ing.) at Technical University of Karlsruhe (today: KIT), Germany in 1993
- obtained a master degree in business engineering (Dipl.-Wirt.Ing.) at Fernuniversitaet Hagen, Germany in 2006
- since 1993 he held several executive positions in international companies serving the flat panel display and electronics industry, for optical systems, metrology, and automation
- 2010 joined AIXTRON SE, a world leading manufacturer for MOCVD equipment, as Director Business Development, with special focus on the portfolio for organic material deposition solutions. He is responsible for worldwide marketing and sales of the respective systems.
- since 1993 various publications and papers about the characterization of electro-optical devices, manufacturing and design of optical components and devices, numerical optimization of displays, computers and networks, process automation, et al.

15:15 Coffee Break
16:00
In Situ, High Resolution 3D Metrology for Real-time Quality Control in Flexible Electronics
  Erik Novak, Director of Bus. Dev., 4D Technology
In Situ, High Resolution 3D Metrology for Real-time Quality Control in Flexible Electronics
Erik Novak

Erik Novak
Director of Bus. Dev.
4D Technology

Abstract
As more flexible electronics products enter large-scale production, focus is increasingly moving from simply demonstrating technological capability towards higher yields, longer lifetimes, and superior performance. To improve profitability and market size of offerings, critical features that can affect performance must be monitored, including surface roughness, defect density, and defect size and slope. Ideally, in-situ metrology can be employed in roll-to-roll equipment to allow real-time process control of these key parameters. Barrier film permeability, circuit performance, and overall yield may all be better controlled via real-time measurements from within the roll-to-roll processing equipment.

This paper will present a compact, low-cost, large-field 3D metrology module for in-situ measurements of flexible electronic substrates. The module is capable of sub-nanometer vertical resolution and micrometer-scale lateral resolution for accurate roughness and defect height determination . Substrates moving at up to 3m/min may be imaged with 2micrometer feature resolution. Modules can be arrayed to provide scalable areal coverage based on each customer's specific needs and are vacuum compatible, vibration-immune, and are unaffected by the film backside or roller characteristics. We will present data from a variety of samples measured while in motion and correlate results with off-line metrology systems of similar capabilities.

Biography
Dr. Erik Novak is Director of Business Development at 4D Technology. He has been developing instrumentation for precision metrology for more than 19 years in applications including displays, optical components, plastic films, MEMS, telecommunications, photovoltaics, and medical devices. He received his PhD from the University of Arizona Optical Sciences College in 1998. Erik has received four R&D 100 awards, holds numerous patents, and has more than sixty publications and book chapters related to surface measurement and industrial process control.

16:25
Review of digital laser microfabrication for flexible electronics manufacturing
  Dimitris Karnakis, Technical Manager - R&D Projects, Oxford Lasers Ltd
Review of digital laser microfabrication for flexible electronics manufacturing
Dimitris Karnakis

Dimitris Karnakis
Technical Manager - R&D Projects
Oxford Lasers Ltd

Abstract
Diode-pumped solid state (DPSS) laser technology facilitates digital fabrication and can become a simple, low cost alternative to printing for flexible electronics. It offers high resolution, maskless direct-write additive or subtractive processing that can be easily reconfigured and scaled up as needed, paving the way for affordable mass customisation without the usual limitations of other production setups. Laser techniques such as (i) laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) printing, (ii) selective laser sintering of conductive inks on top of functional layers, (iii) selective thin-film patterning of multi-layered stacks (P1, P2, P3) or (iv) laser surface functionalisation could be widely adopted for a range of materials on rigid or flexible substrates for prototyping or production. Laser technologies have been investigated for more than a decade on flexible electronics for manufacturing of OLEDs, OPV cells, logic circuits, RFID, biosensors etc. Despite the extensive studies practical problems remain, such as the degradation of processed film edge quality (delamination) or introduction of undesirable non-uniform spatial temperature gradients in sintering affecting process resolution and repeatability, etc and solutions to those will be discussed.
Here, we review the state-of-art of both laser and beam delivery technologies (including ultrafast DPSS, laser beam shaping) for selective thin film patterning, surface functionalisation for controlled wetting, laser-induced forward transfer printing (LIFT) for liquid ink or solid donor targets, conductive ink sintering, via drilling, wafer cutting/dicing to make components such as displays, solar cells, organic transistors, sensors, etc. The advantages and limitations of each laser technology will be discussed. The presented work has been supported by projects FP7-PEOPLE-IAPP project Lasermicrofab, No. 324459 and OLAE+ Digiprint

Biography
Dimitris Karnakis (PhD, Hull University) is Technical Manager for R&D Projects at Oxford Lasers Ltd (UK) having spent time as Applications Engineer and Project Leader for laser micromachining systems since 2003. He is responsible for collaborative research and technology development for advanced laser micro/nanofabrication applications. Dimitris has 25 years' experience in laser technology having previously held various research and management positions at Exitech Ltd (Oxford), Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (Osaka) and Hull University (Hull). He presents frequently at international conferences (> 80 papers) in the field of laser applications and referees regularly for optical engineering journals. He is currently interested in advanced laser beam shaping, ultrathin layer patterning, laser transfer LIFT, conductive material sintering and ultrafast laser processing of dielectrics

16:50

Keynote

 
Challenges and Opportunities in the Manufacturing of Large-Area Organic Robust Imager for X-Ray Sensing (LORIX)
  Octavio Trovarelli, Director of Strategic Projects, Plastic Logic Germany
Challenges and Opportunities in the Manufacturing of Large-Area Organic Robust Imager for X-Ray Sensing (LORIX)
Octavio Trovarelli

Octavio Trovarelli
Director of Strategic Projects
Plastic Logic Germany

Abstract
Despite a regular growth in terms of volume and key features for the global market of X-Ray image sensors, such as analog-to-digital conversion, low operational cost, higher performance and throughput, the market penetration of flat panel digital detectors (FPD) for diagnosis still remains behind that of computed radiography (CR) & film. This is partially linked to the relative long time-to-market of a new modality in medical imaging, but also to some other factors like high costs of system ownership and a lower mechanical reliability of FPD detectors compared to CR & film for some diagnosis applications (e.g. portable). In this talk we will describe how the LORIX1 consortium, formed by leading European technology companies, is addressing the task of speeding up the FPD market penetration in the global X-Ray image sensors market using disruptive technologies. Following an introductory description of the partners and project objectives, we will describe the consortium competences and know-how covering the entire value creation chain - from organic materials manufacturers and technology providers to end-users - for innovative LORIX X-Ray image sensors. We will explain how the use of a cross-KET (key enabling technology), multi-disciplinary approach, combining advanced organic materials and manufacturing printing technologies with microelectronics and photonics is enabling our planned prototype development and demonstrators. Initial project findings and results will be presented. Furthermore, we will focus on the challenges and opportunities of using TOLAE technologies in the manufacturing of the innovative LORIX sensing plates by combining printed organic photodiodes either with active matrices of thin film transistor arrays on glass or on flexible, organic TFT-based plastic foils, depending on the targeted medical, NDT and security applications.

(1)LORIX has received funding from the European Union's H2020 research and innovation program under grant agreement N°644103

Biography
Octavio joined Plastic Logic in 2010 as lead process integrator and subsequently took over the group of process engineering responsible for process development, process integration, technology transfer and innovation projects. Currently he is in charge of Plastic Logic Germany's strategic projects.

Octavio has more than 15 years' experience in research and technology development in the semiconductor industry. Before joining Plastic Logic, Octavio was technology platform manager for wafer-level package technologies at Infineon Technologies and Qimonda.

Octavio holds a diploma and PhD in solid state physics, an MBA and is a former Alexander von Humboldt Fellow.

17:20 END
Thursday, October 8, 2015
Session

Technology/ Materials 1

Chair Metin Koyuncu, Senior Project Manager, Robert Bosch GmbH
Metin Koyuncu

Metin Koyuncu
Senior Project Manager
Robert Bosch GmbH

Biography
Dr. Metin Koyuncu is a senior project manager at the corporate research division of Robert Bosch GmbH, Germany. He is active in the field of electronic packaging for over 10 years. After his responsibility for development projects leading to mass production for the automotive industry, he switched to research on conformable and high density electronic packaging. He was the project coordinator of the EU funded project "Interflex" that focused on the development of heterogeneous integration technologies for a hybrid System-in-Foil. Together with his team Mr. Koyuncu is active in the field of flexible electronic systems, additive manufacturing for electronic packaging and molded interconnect devices. He is the author and co-author of a number of publications and patents in these fields.

09:15

Keynote

 
John de Mello, Professor, Imperial College London
09:45
Status and Prospects of OLED Lighting Technology
  Arne Fleißner, Development Engineer, OSRAM OLED GmbH
Status and Prospects of OLED Lighting Technology
Arne Fleißner

Arne Fleißner
Development Engineer
OSRAM OLED GmbH

Abstract
OLED lighting technology offers many interesting features for various applications. From a design perspective, OLEDs enable high-quality glare-free illumination from very thin light sources with a superb off-state appearance. Furthermore, OLED is an efficient light source with the potential to complement LEDs in the SSL revolution. The increasing number of OLED-based luminaires introduced by luminaire makers highlights that OLEDs are the key emerging technology for general lighting. In addition, the automotive sector has become highly aware of OLED technology, as testified by the host of recent automotive design studies.

Considerable challenges still remain, but we anticipate that once OLED reaches a certain base performance in efficiency, lifetime, robustness and cost, it will enter the lighting and automotive market. We will review recent R&D highlights that have clearly demonstrated the potential of OLED technology for efficiency and operational lifetime.

In our view, automotive will be the first volume application. Market entry will be driven by differentiators against other technologies, like free-form large-area homogeneous emission of rigid OLED panels, and afterwards flexible OLEDs will provide the next major advancement in lighting technology.

We will discuss recent progress in the area of flexible OLEDs that provides an encouraging view on the prospects of OLED lighting with a thin and flexible form factor. Special attention will be paid to the results of the BMBF-funded R2D2 research project, in which partners along the complete value chain from materials research to end users have been working on production capable processes and technologies for flexible OLEDs. Within this project, OSRAM OLED has scaled up the sheet-to-sheet manufacturing of metal-foil based OLEDs which have then been evaluated by automotive end-users in modulisation tests.

Biography
Dr. Arne Fleißner was awarded his PhD in Material Science in 2008 at the Darmstadt University of Technology, Germany. Until 2013 he was working at Cambridge Display Technology, UK, where he developed flexible low-cost low-information-content displays based on all-printed organic light-emitting electrochemical cells (OLECs). Dr. Fleißner joined OSRAM OLED in 2013 to take up one of the key roles in OSRAM's flexible OLED lighting R&D team.

10:10
Integration of polymer organic photodiodes on complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) backplanes for bio and medical applications
  Matthias Jahnel, Researcher, Fraunhofer Institute for Organic Electronics, Electron Beam and Plasma technology FEP
Integration of polymer organic photodiodes on complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) backplanes for bio and medical applications
Matthias Jahnel

Matthias Jahnel
Researcher
Fraunhofer Institute for Organic Electronics, Electron Beam and Plasma technology FEP

Abstract
Solution processed organic photodiodes (OPD) are promising candidates to offer a high potential in optical sensor applications [1][2]. They can be used as photo detectors for industrial process monitoring, health care, as well as for sensors in bio and life science. Organic semiconductors offer general advantages such as simple fabrication and the integration on flexible substrates which enables ultra-thin and low weight devices, especially for large area OPDs. On the other hand, the combination of organic materials deposited on top of CMOS circuit enable a fill factor of up to 100% while minimizing the process complexity and cost [3]. We present different polymer bulk heterojunction OPDs on CMOS compatible electrode materials for sensor and lab-on-a-chip applications. These devices are either based on the polymer-fullerene blends P3HT:PC60BM and P3HT:ICBA to detect light in the visible or on the blends PTB7:PC70BM and PCPDTBT:PC70BM to detect light in the visible and the near infrared range. Every device is built in top absorption geometry where the light passes through a semi-transparent cathode towards the absorption layer. The fraction of absorbed photons in the semi-transparent Ca/Ag cathode, in the TiN/Al anode as well as in the absorption layer P3HT:PC60BM is calculated and compared to experimental data. In conclusion, the spectral sensitivity of the devices mainly depends on the absorption blend layer itself. It is shown that OPD on CMOS enable a fast method to combine various absorber materials with a CMOS backplane and their optimization towards optical requirements for customer specific applications.
[1] M. Burkhard, W. Liu, C. G. Shuttle, et. al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 101, (2012) 033302
[2] F. Arca, E. Kohlstädt, S. F. Tedde, et. al., IEEE (2013) 60, 5 (2013), 1633-1667
[3] D. Baierl, M. Schmidt, G. Scarpa, et. al., IEEE, Ph.D. Research in Microelectronics and Electronics (PRIME), 7th Conference on, (2011) 89-92

Biography
Matthias Jahnel is a Ph.D. candidate in physics in the department of Microdisplays and Sensorics at Fraunhofer FEP combined with TU-Dresden, Germany. He received his Dipl. Ing. (FH) in electrical engineering in 2008 at FH Lausitz (Germany) and worked at the Fraunhofer IPMS, division (COMEDD) from 2008 to 2012 in field of organic semiconductors. During this time he received the M.Sc. in physics at BTU-Cottbus in 2012 and worked as scientific research assistant at Fraunhofer COMEDD from 2012 to 2013. He worked as Ph.D. candidate associate with Prof. Chan Im from 2013 to 2014 in the department KFnSC at Konkuk University (Republic of Korea). Jahnel has expertise in metal semiconductors and organic and printed electronics, especially OPD, OPVs, and OLEDs. He is currently interested in printed electronics, roll-to-roll processes and a combination of organic with metal semiconductors for organic optoelectronics and sensorics.

10:35
New Transfer Method for Flexible Display Fabricating
  Tadahiro Furukawa, Associate Professor, Yamagata University
New Transfer Method for Flexible Display Fabricating
Tadahiro Furukawa

Tadahiro Furukawa
Associate Professor
Yamagata University

Abstract
I will present "Dimension Control of CF Fabricated by Transfer Method" in SID display week 2015(Paper No. 4.4).  This presentation will be focused on basic technology about dimension control. Therefore, it will be introduced about "new transfer method" simply. 
New transfer method consists of the following processes. 1) The peelable layer was formed on the glass. 2) ITO pattern was formed on pealable layer. 3) Color filter pattern was formed on another peelable layer (on another substrate). 4) ITO pattern and pealable layer were transferred onto temporary substrate. 5) Color filter pattern and pealable layer were transferred onto peerable layer and ITO pattern witch were forms on temporary substrate. 6) ITO pattern and color filter pattern that is stacked on the temporary substrate was transferred onto the film substrate. SUS was used for the temporary substrate
To construct these processes, many technical problems have been solved. In the plastic electronics symposium, I will present about this "new transfer method" in detail. These issues will not be presented in SID display week 2015.
By this technology, it is possible of dividing of manufacturing processes, and very effective to improvement in the yield and shortening of a lead time.

Biography
1984/3 Graduated the master's degree at Saitama University
1984/4-2011/10 Kyodo Printing Co.,LTD
2011/11- INOEL Yamagata University

Specialty
Flexible devices, materials and components
Patterning techniques

11:00 Coffee Break
Session

Technology/ Materials 2

Chair André Zimmermann, Executive Board Member, Hahn-Schickard
André Zimmermann

André Zimmermann
Executive Board Member
Hahn-Schickard

Biography
André Zimmermann studied chemistry and crystallography at Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg as well as materials science at the Technical University Darmstadt. After several research stays in the USA at NIST (National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland) and University of Washington (Seattle, Washington) he received his PhD in materials science from the Technical University Darmstadt.

In 1999, he became a group manager at the Max-Planck-Institute for Metals Research in Stuttgart where his research focused on the reliability of materials and on the assembly and interconnection technology of actuators for adaptronics.

Between 2002 and 2014 he was holding various positions within the corporate research and development of Robert Bosch GmbH in Waiblingen in the area of electronic assembly and interconnection technology, computer aided engineering, strategy and innovation management. A focus of his tasks at Robert Bosch GmbH was the position as senior manager for electronic packaging.

Since January 2015 he is professor for microtechnology at the IFM (Institut für Mikrointegration) at the University of Stuttgart. Simultaneously, he became an executive board member of Hahn-Schickard, a non-profit organisation for applied research on microsystems technology.

The current work of André Zimmermann concentrates on the following fields: electronic assembly and interconnection technology, reliability of microsystems.

11:30
Vacuum-deposited fluoropolymer films for organic electronics
  Kostyantyn Grytsenko, Researcher, Institute for Semiconductor Physics
Vacuum-deposited fluoropolymer films for organic electronics
Kostyantyn Grytsenko

Kostyantyn Grytsenko
Researcher
Institute for Semiconductor Physics

Abstract
First researches concerned thin polymer film production by decomposition of bulk polymer in vacuum and condensation of chemically active fragments of macromolecule on substrate were made in mid-20th century. Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) was among the first tested polymers. The perflouoropolymer (PFP) films were deposited using various gas phase methods: thermal decomposition, magnetron sputtering, laser ablation, plasma polymerisation and hot-wire chemical vapor deposition. Partially fluorinated polymer (FP) films were deposited by gas phase methods and wet methods as well. Recently the thin FP films found several industrial applications. They include film applications both in traditional domains like antifriction and protective coatings and in high-technology devices: barrier, dielectric, aligning and protective layers in organic light emitting diodes, organic field effect transistors, sensors, optical waveguide layers, etc. For example, the vacuum deposited PTFE thin (20 nm) buffer layer was used in organic light emitting diode, developed in South Korea. The quantum efficiency of devices was improved about twice. The PFP films were used in organic field-effect transistors as aligning, dielectic and protective layers.
For advanced applications the PFP films, filled with metal nanoparticles or/and organic compounds are designing and studying. PFP, filled with silver and gold nanoparticles, were tested for biocide coatings and plasmonic sensors.
We developed the special method of deposition of PTFE films in vacuum, which allows co-deposition with organic dyes. Produced dye-filled PTFE films revealed extreme stability of the optical properties under environment actions. Dye-filled PTFE films were used as laser recording media for super-high density archive storage and optical reversible media. PTFE films, filled with both dye- and metal nanoparticles, are using as optical sensors for aggressive compounds.

Biography
Dr. K. Grytsenko was born, got education and started research in Ukraine. He was among the persons, who pioneered research in the field of formation of soft condensed matter in vacuum and its application in optoelectronics since eighties of the 20th century. He employed all gas phase deposition methods: physical vapour deposition, chemical vapour deposition including the plasma enhanced, laser evaporation, ionisation- assisted deposition of chalcogenide glasses. Various thin films were produced: polymers, dyes, metal-polymer nano-composites before the term "nano-technology" appeared.

He worked at: Institute for Problems of Information Recording and Institute of Semiconductor Physics, both of National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Metal-Polymer Research Institute of Belarus Academy of Sciences, Technische Hochschule Wildau.

His experience includes:
- Strategic planning of the design of organic functional films for optoelectronics;
- Organization of collaboration between Ukrainian and EU, Ca, USA institutions;
- Design of combined deposition methods for molecules with complex chemical structure and nano-composites. Matching organic molecule structure with deposition technology. Organic molecules for self-assembled nano-structures and in multilayered systems.
- Technology of PTFE and nano-composite films production were transferred to TH Wildau.

Dr. K. Grytsenko published 60 Papers in journals, 110 Conference Reports and 9 Patents.

11:55
Patterning of large-area & flexible polymer photovoltaic modules by laser ablation
  Anthony Barbot, Postdoctoral Researcher, CEA
Patterning of large-area & flexible polymer photovoltaic modules by laser ablation
Anthony Barbot

Anthony Barbot
Postdoctoral Researcher
CEA

Abstract
Even though the efficiency of plastic solar cells has considerably been improved at the laboratory scale, the fabrication of large area modules remains a challenge. One of the most important tasks relates to the serial association of multiple cells in modules since the interconnection areas do not participate in the power conversion. In order to reduce the "dead" regions and increase the Geometrical Fill Factor (GFF), which is defined by the ratio of the active area on the total area of the system, the patterning of photovoltaic modules must involve precise techniques. However, the low resolution of the classical coating technologies has not allowed the achievement of GFF over 80% yet. Using laser ablation to structure the different layers, which were previously deposited on the whole surface, is therefore a promising alternating technology to manufacture high-GFF solar modules. This processing has already been used successfully to develop thin film photovoltaic modules such as CIGS solar cells but few attempts have been performed to make organic photovoltaic systems. And yet laser patterning could seriously impact the industrialization and commercialization of these new photovoltaic products since it is potentially compatible with both sheet-to-sheet and roll-to-roll processes, and would additionally allow for a rapid scribing of various high-resolution structures. Here, we propose to present our advances in development of polymer photovoltaic modules structured with a commercial picosecond laser. Different laser-patterned structures, materials (including but not limited to P3HT) and coating processes were investigated and efficient modules from 5x5 to 15x15 cm² with GFF over 90% were obtained. Opportunities, challenges, issues and performance will be discussed with the support of various electrical and optical characterization techniques such as contact resistance measurements, microscope images and calculation of power losses caused by the interconnections.

Biography
In 2011, Anthony BARBOT received an engineer diploma in physical chemistry from the Graduate School of Chemistry and Physics of Bordeaux (ENSCBP). He then joined the XLIM institute for a PhD under the supervision of Dr. Bruno Lucas. He studied the doping of organic semi-conductors for photovoltaic applications and obtained his PhD degree in electronic and material sciences from the University of Limoges in 2014. He is currently a postdoctoral researcher at the Atomic Energy and Alternative Energies Commission (CEA) and works on the development of large-area and flexible photovoltaic modules.

12:20

Keynote

 
High Performance Organic Semiconductor Manufacturing Using Printing and Photolithographic Processes
  Mark James, R&D Director, Merck Chemicals Ltd
High Performance Organic Semiconductor Manufacturing Using Printing and Photolithographic Processes
Mark James

Mark James
R&D Director
Merck Chemicals Ltd

Abstract
Merck has been actively researching Organic Electronic materials since 2000 with the objectives to develop products that enable mass production of plastic electronic devices.

We demonstrate how the co-development of organic semiconductors, passive materials and formulations with process optimisation enable the manufacture of high performance OTFT arrays suitable for mass production of display backplanes and other circuit applications using polymeric organic semiconductor systems. These materials can be either printed or patterned using photolithographic process to fabricate OTFT's with commercially viable device sizes and mobilities greater than amorphous silicon.

Biography
Mark James has a PhD in organic synthesis. After postdoctoral research he joined ICI and remained there for 18 years seeing the transformation through Zeneca to Avecia. He managed projects ranging from biocide design to developing inkjet processes to manufacture PCB's. In 2005 he moved to the CPI and managed their flexible electronics operation. Mark joined Merck in 2006, leading the company's functional material patterning activities and in 2010 took over responsible for Merck's Organic Electronics Business covering the development of and commercialisation of organic semiconductor materials for display backplanes, circuits, OPV and OPD applications. From 2014 he became Merck's global head of R&D for Electronic Materials.

12:50 Final Remarks
  Luigi Occhipinti, Outreach and Business Development Manager, Univ. of Cambridge / EPSRC Centre for Innovative Manufacturing in Large-Area Electronics
Luigi Occhipinti

Luigi Occhipinti
Outreach and Business Development Manager
Univ. of Cambridge / EPSRC Centre for Innovative Manufacturing in Large-Area Electronics

Biography
Dr. Luigi Occhipinti joined the University of Cambridge in April 2014, as Outreach Manager of the EPSRC Center of Innovative Manufacturing for Large Area Electronics, and Business Development Manager of the Cambridge Innovation and Knowledge Centre (CIKC).
He has 20 years of experience driving research and innovation in the global semiconductor industry, pioneering the field of post-silicon technologies, organic and printed electronics, carbon nanotubes and graphene-based flexible electronics, smart systems heterogeneous integration and sensors.
Prior to joining the University of Cambridge, he was R&D Senior Group Manager and Programs Director for Flexible and Disposable Electronics at STMicroelectronics, leading research teams in Italy, France and Singapore and company initiatives for new business development based on Heterogeneous Integration, Flexible and Disposable Electronics, MEMS-based sensors and diagnostic bio-systems.
Luigi has an Electronic Engineering degree and a PhD in Electrical Engineering. He has authored and co-authored over 80 scientific publications and 35 patents.
For more than a decade, Luigi has been an active and recognised expert in the field of OLAE (Organic and Large-Area Electronics) and innovative manufacturing techniques, acting as Project Coordinator and Principal Investigator of more than 12 EC funded programs, under Framework Programme 6 and FP7, in the areas of ICT (Information and Communication Technologies) and NMP (Nanosciences, Nanotechnologies, Materials, and new Production Technologies), and member of 2 IEEE (P1620, P1620.1) and 3 IEC standardization technical committees (TC105, TC111, TC113).

12:55 Lunch