Wednesday, November 14, 2018
Session 1

Market Trends and Future Outlook

14:30 Welcome
  SEMI GAAC - spokesman
14:40
Rethinking car software and electronics architecture
  Ondrej Burkacky, Partner, McKinsey & Company
Rethinking car software and electronics architecture
Ondrej Burkacky

Ondrej Burkacky
Partner
McKinsey & Company

Ondrej Burkacky

Abstract
The most important parts of cars are shifting from mechanical to digital, heralding big changes in the industry’s competitive stakes. While the path forward for both technologies and business models remains uncertain, I will share ten hypotheses regarding tomorrow’s automotive electrical or electronic architecture and its implications.

Biography
- Based in McKinsey & Company's Munich office since 2007 - He is part of Digital McKinsey - He leads McKinsey's Embedded Software initiative and Software Service Line in Europe - He is also a member of the Advanced Industries Practice, specifically automotive and semiconductor industry with focus on product development

15:05 Concept Car 2030
  TBD
15:30 Automotive Electronics Standards
  Andreas Aal, Semiconductor Strategy & Reliability, Volkswagen AG
15:55 COFFEE BREAK
Session 2

Electronics Automotive Value Chain for 2030

16:30 Tier 1 - Perspective
  TBA, Visteon
16:55
Driving automotive Innovation – comprehensive design
  Burkhard Huhnke, Vice President Automotive Strategy, SYNOPSYS
Driving automotive Innovation – comprehensive design
Burkhard Huhnke

Burkhard Huhnke
Vice President Automotive Strategy
SYNOPSYS

Burkhard Huhnke

Abstract
What an exciting time we live in: self-driving cars, fully electric and always connected to the internet to provide the user a seamless transportation experience. Many announcements around the mobile phone on wheels have been made. Some of the most exciting innovations happening in our cars: cars are becoming our co-pilots as intelligent technologies make them safe and secure, more comfortable, and more autonomous. And with full connectivity the car becomes the new gold mine, a big data collector processing real time traffic data and millions of miles per day. To enable smart, connected and autonomous vehicles, the car’s electronic architecture, its supporting soft and hardware design and release processes must be adjusted. Any failure in the field results in very high cost and liability to the car manufacturer. Requirements for a robust, comprehensive design of a fault tolerant system must be newly formulated. A holistic view of the system failure rate along the supply chain, lifecycle of automotive development and production is necessary. Consequently, robustness, safety, and security of self driving systems must be significantly increased and be monitored continuously. Robust design begins in the early phase of car concepts. Automotive IP centers of excellence have been created, to ensure automotive compliant intellectual property for faster, smarter, low-energy chips reducing risk and development time. Automotive SoC design is meeting the highest safety integrity levels (ASIL) providing ADAS IP as design basis for the new advanced driver assistants architecture. By providing a simulation platform based on the processor models, early virtual prototyping, emulation, and functional verification from modelling to test bench deployment becomes possible. Software experts will be required to ensure fault tolerant, highly reliable, functionally safe and secure software along the automotive lifecycle.

Biography
Dr. Burkhard Huhnke is the Vice President of Automotive Strategy at Synopsys. He joined Synopsys earlier this year. Prior to Synopsys, he was SVP of Product Innovation & E-Mobility at VW, based in Silicon Valley. He was responsible for synchronizing VW's innovation activities and alliances to identify new concept ideas, business models and partners in the US and had end-to-end ownership of the electric vehicle platform in North America. Prior to that, he held several positions both in the US and Germany, including Senior GM, Electronics System Integration and Whole Vehicle Integration. Dr. Huhnke studied electrical engineering, at the University of Braunschweig. His dissertation about optical distance measurement was awarded with the International Measurement Prize. Dr. Huhnke serves as Research Fellow the Hult Business School in San Francisco, and is a member of the Board of Advisors at the College of Engineering at University of Tennessee Knoxville and at the College of Engineering and Computer Science at University of Tennessee Chattanooga.

17:20 Automotive & Advanced Manufacturing
  TBA, GLOBALFOUNDRIES
17:45
Revolution of Automotive Architectures through IT and Network Infrastructure Concepts
  Stefan Singer, Fellow & Director, EMEA CAS Automotive, NXP
Revolution of Automotive Architectures through IT and Network Infrastructure Concepts
Stefan Singer

Stefan Singer
Fellow & Director, EMEA CAS Automotive
NXP

Stefan Singer

Abstract
The Automotive Industry is seeing more dramatic changes in the next few years than in previous decades combined. Vehicles are becoming always connected and part of the internet. Drive trains evolve from combustion engines to mixtures of hybrid and electric vehicles with new challenges (e.g. for reach). Most dramatic is the change to more and more assisted driving up to future level 3-5 automated vehicles. All of those factors result in the development, that existing E/E architectures are not capable of supporting those requirements. Instead of small evolutionary changes some more dramatic departure is required. While the new functions demand new solutions, many of the existing functions in a vehicle (e.g. body comfort functions, …) do not require new features and therefore a new architecture, that allows the reuse of many legacy ECUs without changes can have a huge economic benefit. The presentation will show how concepts from IT and Network Infrastructure Solutions can be brought into Automotive while taking automotive specific requirements (e.g. startup times, thermal management) into consideration. The presentation will touch on several of the attributes and consequences, e.g. of different functions into one box (Virtualization, Isolation, Validation) and Communication schemes for such an architecture. Additionally we need to consider, that cars are an attractive Target for Hackers. In highly networked cars we need to be concerned about protecting privacy, increasing safety and preventing unauthorized access. Connected vehicles create a multi dimensional challenge to address vehicle safety (Zero accidents by human error), security (Zero accidents by system hacks), functional safety and also device reliability. Another topic is, that such a new architecture requires rethinking of conventional wisdom for functional safety.

Biography
Stefan Singer is a Technical Fellow at NXP Semiconductors in Munich, Germany. He leads the European Automotive Field Applications Team and has held a number of positions at Motorola Semiconductor, Freescale and NXP in the US and Germany. Stefan holds a Dipl.-Ing. degree from the Technical University in Munich. Due to his personal background in communication, networking and Automotive he has passion for automotive networking architectures (especially Ethernet) and Computing.

18:10 End