Tuesday, November 13, 2018
Session 1

Directions and Standardization

12:30 Introduction
12:40

Keynote

 
Advanced Packaging Developments—Where Are We Going?
  Jan Vardaman, President and Founder, TechSearch International, Inc.
Advanced Packaging Developments—Where Are We Going?
Jan Vardaman

Jan Vardaman
President and Founder
TechSearch International, Inc.

Jan Vardaman

Abstract
The semiconductor industry packaging and assembly business continues many changes. The smart factory is the new industrial revolution, driving sensors, machine-to-machine communication, as well as data storage and analysis. The adoption of 5G and ADAS changes the package designs and materials. Growing demand for datacenters and artificial intelligence or machine learning is pushing us to the next semiconductor nodes at a faster rate. The adoption of the next advanced semiconductor nodes will present challenges that must be met with new package developments. In addition, the next 10 years is likely to see new drivers for advanced packaging. This presentation describes some of the applications and the challenges for advanced packaging.

Biography
Jan Vardaman is the President and Founder of TechSearch International,Inc., which has been providing licensing and consulting services in semiconductor packaging since 1987. She is co-author of Nikkan Kogyo’s How to Make IC Packages (in Japanese), a columnist with Circuits Assembly Magazine, and the author of numerous publications on emerging trends in semiconductor packaging and assembly. She is a member of IEEE CPMT, IMAPS, MEPTEC, and SEMI.

13:10
SEMI Standards: Update on Fan-Out Panel Level Packaging Standardization
  James Amano, Sr Director, Int'l Standards, SEMI
SEMI Standards: Update on Fan-Out Panel Level Packaging Standardization
James Amano

James Amano
Sr Director, Int'l Standards
SEMI

James Amano

Abstract
Fan-Out Panel Level Packaging (FO-PLP) technology is an enhanced packaging technology, embedding die in a low-cost substrate which is patterned to allow higher density of IOs than would otherwise be supported by the chip size. A number of different formats – including circular and rectangular – have been proposed for the panels into which the die are embedded, with a large number of different rectangular sizes. This wide range is delaying broad acceptance of FO-PLP technologies, as the tools must be customized for each different format. Panel substrates today range from 300 mm to 920 mm. Cost advantages depend on package and substrate size, and lack of standardization is a barrier to high volume manufacturing. Despite its advantages, fan-out packaging has challenges to overcome. To address these issues, the SEMI Standards Fan-Out Panel Level Packaging Task Force is currently developing standards focusing on panels, targeting dimensions, ID marking and orientation, edge exclusion, and other parameters such as total thickness variation (TTV), bow, and warp. Created in 1973, the SEMI International Standards Program brings together industry experts to exchange ideas and work towards developing globally accepted technical standards. SEMI provides the forum for the essential collaborations that must be achieved to move new and existing markets forward efficiently and profitably.

Biography
James Amano has led the SEMI International Standards Program since 2008. Prior to joining SEMI, he worked as the Silicon Valley sales engineer for Matsusada Precision, and as a trade specialist for the Japan External Trade Organization (JETRO). He holds degrees in Economics and Environmental Conservation from the University of Colorado at Boulder.

Session 2

Advanced Dicing

13:35
Optimising Surface Chemistry After Plasma Dicing (SPTS Technologies & Versum Materials US, LLC)
  Janet Hopkins, Etch Applications Manager, SPTS Technologies Ltd
Optimising Surface Chemistry After Plasma Dicing (SPTS Technologies & Versum Materials US, LLC)
Janet Hopkins

Janet Hopkins
Etch Applications Manager
SPTS Technologies Ltd

Janet Hopkins

Abstract
Authors: J. Hopkins, O. Ansell, R. Barnett (SPTS Technologies) & M. Phenis, D. Pfettscher, R. Peters, M. Sistern (Versum Materials US, LLC) Plasma dicing has shown many benefits over other dicing techniques such as increased die strength, smaller/thinner die and reduced cost of ownership. This dicing process uses the established Bosch Process, with alternating etch and deposition steps to etch through the silicon wafer. The nature of the process means that there will be F residues remaining at completion due to the CFx polymer layer deposited on the wafer surfaces[1]. This can be removed by an O2 plasma however when solder bumps are present and subjected to the same dicing/Bosch process, the bumps can react with F radicals to form SnF2 which cannot be removed by an O2 plasma alone. An additional plasma process can be performed to reduce the F levels further, however, this still leaves F present. Studies are underway to determine whether this is an issue for subsequent steps or indeed whether the presence of F may help solderability[2]. However, in this work, the effectiveness of post-dicing wet cleans to remove the SnF2, and avoid any potential issues, is investigated. Tests were carried out comparing plasma DAG (dicing after grind) processes with different post residue treatments. A screening test was carried out using several different wet etch formulations, and two suitable formulations were identified. Further tests were carried out to optimise the conditions and check the tape compatibility. The F levels, measured by EDX, were reduced to <1% at a level comparable to the control sample (with no plasma dicing). The work has shown that a wet chemistry post plasma dicing treatment is capable of removing F residues and is compatible with the plasma dicing process flow. References 1. “Method of Anisotropically Etching Silicon” F. Lärmer, A. Schilp, , German Patent DE4241045 2. Hosoda et al, Proceedings of ECO design 2003, Tokyo, Japan, December 8-11, 2003, p 710-713

Biography
Janet Hopkins is the Etch Applications Manager at SPTS Technologies, currently focusing on plasma dicing. Janet joined the company in 1995, as Process Engineer in the Si etch group. During her career, she has worked in developing different plasma sources and processes, including early commercialisation of the Bosch Process for deep silicon etching of MEMS. She is the author of many papers and patents. She holds a BSc in Physics and Chemistry of Materials from The University of Durham and a PhD in Plasma Surface Modification.

14:00
Solutions for thin and tiny dies with high die strength and for thinning WLCSP and eWLB wafers
  Gerald Klug, General Sales Manager, DISCO HI-TEC EUROPE
Solutions for thin and tiny dies with high die strength and for thinning WLCSP and eWLB wafers
Gerald Klug

Gerald Klug
General Sales Manager
DISCO HI-TEC EUROPE

Gerald Klug

Abstract
DISCO Corporation is a leading manufacturer for equipment and tools for wafer thinning/dicing. “Bringing science to comfortable living by Kiru (Dicing), Kezuru (Grinding) and Migaku (Polishing)” is DISCO’s mission. By combining these three core technologies, DISCO provides total solutions to meet the demanding requirements of the Semiconductor industry in terms of manufacturing thin dies with high die-strength and several new approaches for advanced packaging. A wide range of devices tend to have narrow street widths (cut margins), partially covered with low-k or ultra low-k layers in order to maximize the number of dies formed on a wafer. Furthermore, mobile and IoT consumer products incorporate an ever-increasing number of such circuit components. Quality requirements of consumer products are heading for same level as automotive products or even exceed those. In order to fulfil all these requirements, DISCO proposes several solutions focusing on avoidance of side wall cracks and interfacial layer damages. DISCO will update on latest status of Stealth Dicing, high quality laser grooving, multi beam ablation laser cutting, dicing wafers with the active side facing to the tape, applying plasma dicing and remote plasma as well as combinations of these technologies in one process flow. WLCSP and eWLB applications are facing issues in wafer thinning, as the wafers, due to consisting of resin mold and Silicon dies while having high bumps on the front side, tend to easily break when thickness becomes lower than the bump height. Nevertheless, such low thickness is required due to increasing bump thickness. DISCO offers a unique technology to grind wafers with 200 µm high bumps down to 50 µm wafer thickness. DISCO HI-TEC EUROPE GmbH, having its facilities close to Munich airport, offers certified Dicing and Grinding Production Services, so that customers can utilize most of the afore mentioned DISCO technologies in production, even without investing into DISCO equipment.

Biography
Gerald Klug Biography Gerald Klug studied business engineering at the University of Siegen and graduated in 1998 as Dipl.-Wirt.-Ing., completing his thesis at BMW in Munich. He started his career as a designer of coil processing lines for nearly 3 years at a German machine manufacturing company, Heinrich Georg GmbH. At the end of 2000, he joined DISCO as a Sales Engineer for the area of Scandinavia. Meanwhile he has been almost 18 years at DISCO, nowadays operating as General Sales Manager for the whole of Europe

14:25
Impact of Plasma Dicing Singulation Techniques on Die Breakage Strength and Robustness
  David Parker, Project Manager, ST Microelectronics
Impact of Plasma Dicing Singulation Techniques on Die Breakage Strength and Robustness
David Parker

David Parker
Project Manager
ST Microelectronics

David Parker

Abstract
For all end applications where a semiconductor device is used, there is a constant demand for improved performance under all environmental conditions. One such application, which we all use regularly, is the smartcard chip. This secure microcontroller can be found predominantly in our bank or travel cards and passports, where it may receive much physical punishment in normal usage. The demands for severe robustness criteria for these card-based applications are continually increasing to ensure that the packaged chips are able to withstand more rigorous treatment without breaking. Key to achieving these exacting standards is the singulation of the chips in a way that does not generate any inherent mechanical weakness. The standard blade sawing process has so far met existing requirements but the technology roadmap for such devices has presented new challenges with the deployment of fragile ultra-low k BEOL dielectrics. This has prompted the introduction of laser grooving before dicing to minimise damage to these materials caused by the sawing blade but this, in combination with mechanical dicing can itself cause weakening of the die and a higher risk of failure. This paper will examine the relationship between die strength and some new approaches to die singulation with a strong focus on plasma dicing, in which die separation is achieved by etching the silicon in the scribe lane. As there is no mechanical element we should expect significant improvements in die strength so we will explore the inherent performance with this method as the etching output parameters and masking steps are varied. Additionally, this technique requires that the silicon is exposed in the scribe street, which must be free of metals and dielectrics before etching. Again laser grooving can be used to meet these conditions and we will describe how sequential laser grooving and plasma etch processes affect the die strength and reliability performance versus the more severe test criteria.

Biography
Mr Parker graduated in Chemistry from The University of Manchester, UK in 1981. Since the start of his career in semiconductors with Inmos Ltd the following year he has spent over 30 years with ST Microelectronics both in Agrate, Italy and Rousset, France. Beginning as a process engineer, mainly in deposition and patterning, he has extensive experience of front-end operations, including device engineering, process integration and technology transfer. In recent years he has taken on a project management role to lead ST's interests in plasma dicing within the Back-end Manufacturing and Technology R&D team that is based in Grenoble.

14:50 Coffee Break
Session 3

Innovative Packaging Solutions

Wednesday, November 14, 2018
Session 4

Test & Reliability

09:00 Introduction
09:10

Keynote

 
MEMS Sensor Testing - Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow (an OSAT's perspective)
  Gerard John, Sr Director Advanced Test, Amkor Technology Inc
MEMS Sensor Testing - Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow (an OSAT's perspective)
Gerard John

Gerard John
Sr Director Advanced Test
Amkor Technology Inc

Gerard John

Abstract
The concept of MEMS sensor testing has evolved from a fantasy to a reality over the last two decades. What was once considered impossible in high volume manufacture has now become mainstream in the industry. Initially, MEMS sensor devices were introduced as an alternative to bulky technologies, with lower performances than their predecessors. However, today's MEMS devices with proven reliability and performances have surpassed their predecessors and are competing with their high-cost and high-end counterparts. Examples of such MEMS sensor devices can be seen in the MEMS microphones whose early specifications started off as a simple audio transducer, now has morphed into high-fidelity MEMS device, competing with the high-end studio microphones. Testing such “high-performance” MEMS sensor devices in high volumes at the lowest possible costs with little or no compromises calls for an innovative combination of test techniques and close cooperation between the OSAT and the MEMS design engineers, product engineers and the applications engineers. Areas that are often overlooked are, the form factor of the device under test, the use of test techniques that can provide a higher throughput than electrical testing and the final end application. The ability to include self-test and self-calibration structures into the design will reduce the test burden. The main challenge faced during MEMS sensor test is in the stimulus development, while the electrical testing can be easily accomplished by a low-end tester. When creating MEMS test specifications, a careful balance needs to be drawn between too much and too little test coverage. This keynote focuses on the evolution, challenges, and opportunities for MEMS sensor testing spanning the yesterdays, today and will provide a vision for the future of lower cost MEMS sensor test.

Biography
Gerard joined Amkor in 2005, and has supported and managed hardware and software test development for a variety of Amkor packaging. He currently serves as an advanced test technical expert for MEMS, 2.5D, WLFO, HDFO, fine pitch probe and optical devices, supporting customers in the US and Europe. Prior to joining Amkor, Gerard worked in various semiconductor test positions for Conexant Systems, Flarion Technologies (acquired by Qualcomm) and Motorola. He holds a BA degree in electronics and telecommunications engineering from Osmania University and an MBA from Gainey School of Business in Michigan. He holds multiple patents in the field of MEMS Test.

09:40
Thermomechanical reliability of Large Wafer Level Chip Scale Packages (LWLCSP) in Board Level reliability thermal cycling qualification test
  Balaji Nandhivaram Muthuraman, Package & Material Simulaiton Engineer, Dialog Semiconductor GmbH
Thermomechanical reliability of Large Wafer Level Chip Scale Packages (LWLCSP) in Board Level reliability thermal cycling qualification test
Balaji Nandhivaram Muthuraman

Balaji Nandhivaram Muthuraman
Package & Material Simulaiton Engineer
Dialog Semiconductor GmbH

Balaji Nandhivaram Muthuraman

Abstract
In this paper , for very first time in industry , we discuss about a Large Wafer Level Chip Scale package (LWLCSP) of size 12 mm* 4.6 mm, with an estimated solder interconnect/pin counts(IOs) of 442 IOs along with different die thickness (6mils and 10 mils) and underfill conditions. Four different Test vehicles were constructed with thinner (6 mils) / thicker (10 mils) silicon chip with and without underfill material. To assess the device reliability, extensive Board Level Reliability Temperature Cycling Test (BLR-TCT) qualification was conducted with a temperature cycling range between -40°C till +85°C until significant solder joint fatigue failures are observed. As an interesting fact, the failure mode with underfill devices and non-underfill devices were quite different. No-Underfill Large Wafer Level Chip Scale Package (No UF LWLCSP) devices experienced solder joint bulk cracks, whereas the UnderFill Large Wafer Level Chip Scale Package (UF LWLCSP) experience cracks on the intermetallic layer between the silicon chip and Re-distribution Layer (RDL). To evaluate BLR-TCT qualification tests, Finite Element Method (FEM) simulations were carried out. Parameters like RDL size, Aluminium Pad(AP) thickness and the routing method of RDL – AP layer interconnection is evaluated using numerical techniques. Critical parameters were extracted from the numerical model to correlate the shift in failure mode mechanism observed in BLR qualification measurement tests. Numerical simulation model results show a clear correlation with the failure observed in BLR Qualification tests. Large WLCSP devices with underfill experienced a higher peeling stress on RDL-AP interface. After design optimizations, relevant solutions have been found. This research work can answer the technical challenges faced in large WLCSP packages and the necessary optimization technique that can reduce the critical stress locations in the integrated circuits.

Biography
Balaji Nandhivaram Muthuraman is working as Packaging and Material Simulation engineer in Dialog Semiconductor GmbH, Germany. He obtained his Bachelor's degree in Aeronautical Engineering from Anna University, Chennai,India. Followed by, Master's degree in Computational Mechanics of Materials and Structures from University of Stuttgart, Germany. His current area of working interest are Board level reliability of electronic packages, Developing fatigue model for reliability assessment of Dialogs products.

10:05
Advanced package test solution for the automotive market
  Alex Waldauf, VP of Platfrom Engineering, Cohu
Advanced package test solution for the automotive market
Alex Waldauf

Alex Waldauf
VP of Platfrom Engineering
Cohu

Alex Waldauf

Abstract
Consumer demand and competitive pressure have pushed automotive manufacturers to build greater intelligence into automobiles and trucks. For example, the Chevy Volt uses nearly 100 microprocessors running about 10 million lines of code in total, placing the Chevy Volt's software content close to that of the Boeing 787 Dreamliner. As with that electric vehicle, mainstream automotive design is increasingly relying on more sophisticated electronic systems. Indeed, advances in automotive technology revolve around five key trend: • Advanced Driver Assistance System (ADAS) and autonomous driving • Advanced Motor Control • Engine/Energy Management Systems • Graphical Interfaces and entertainment • Vehicle System of Systems in the Internet of Things These growing trends require new advanced packages which had not been used to such an extent in harsh automotive environment in the past, e.g. combination of dedicated vision processors, multicore CPUs and vision software. For motor control new MCU and FPGA Solutions, for IOT, new combo MEMS, 5G for wireless external connectivity and extended bus systems for internal subsystem links. Most of these developments were possible by integrating more and more functionality into one package and maintaining the stringent automotive safety and reliability requirements. New Backend test and handling systems had to be developed to address the new package requirements to ensure robust functionality. This breakthrough technology provides: • the lowest CoT for High Volume Manufacturing • Tri-temp for WLP, Fan-out and other small and mid-size packages including vision inspection • Stimuli for Combo MEMS • Fine pitch Kelvin contacting

Biography
Alexander J. Waldauf - Vice President of Platform Engineering Alex Waldauf was one of the founders of Cohu's Rasco subsidiary in 1998 and has been Vice President of Platform Engineering since July 2017. Mr. Waldauf was Vice President and General Manager of Rasco since January 2011, previously responsible for the Test-In-Strip product line, Managing Director of Rasco and global Vice President of Sales and Service. Prior to founding Rasco, Mr. Waldauf spent 6 years at Multitest and held key positions in engineering. Mr. Waldauf has a Mechanical Engineering degree from the Austrian School of Technology in Salzburg (HTL).

10:30
Interpretation and Application of Test Socket and Probe Head Specification
  Bert Brost, Product Manager, Xcerra
Interpretation and Application of Test Socket and Probe Head Specification
Bert Brost

Bert Brost
Product Manager
Xcerra

Bert Brost

Abstract
Decisions should be supported with verifiable and repeatable performance data. This is true when selecting contactors, test sockets, and probe heads for test. This intent of this paper is to describe and define the data used to specify contactors, test sockets, and probe heads for test. This includes the source methodology and process for developing the lab data describing the performance of contactors, test sockets, and probe heads for test. With this the paper will lead the way to interpret and apply the statistically predicted field performance of the test probe as qualified in a test lab. Presented will be lab data describing the performance of several mainstream probe architectures for contacting Wafer Level Chip Scale Packages (WLCSP). The goal of this paper is to create a common understanding of how to read, interpret, and communicate data for selecting the right probe technology for WLCSP test applications. The paper goes beyond the probes and speaks to other factors that contribute to the overall performance of the contactors, test sockets, and probe heads for test. For example, the probe head housing design and materials used are important aspects that need to be understood for optimized performance. The success of the data-driven probe selection approach is reliant upon the quality of the supplier data. The paper will describe the reports provided including the WLCSP Metrology reports. Focus Content: • Interconnect technologies for improved performance and reliability • The role of material, and material development for higher reliability • Metrology and inspection methods

Biography
Bert Brost Biography Bert is a Senior Product Manager for Xcerra Corporation. With more than 35 years of experience in backend test, Bert has held senior management positions with Johnstech International and Control Data Corporation. Bert started his career in engineering with Micro Component Technology (MCT) designing test electronics and later worked as an engineer for Sick Optik Elektronic GmbH. Bert holds several undergraduate degrees and a MBA from the University of St. Thomas, Minnesota.

10:55 Coffee Break
Session 5

New Features and Materials

11:30

Keynote

 
Keynote
  TBA, imec
12:00

Keynote

 
Secure packaging for addressing hardware security challenges
  Jacques Fournier, Senior scientist, CEA Leti
Secure packaging for addressing hardware security challenges
Jacques Fournier

Jacques Fournier
Senior scientist
CEA Leti

Jacques Fournier

Abstract
The advent of the IoT has put the device on the centerstage of security-related debates. Attacks on the device itself can have a severe impact on the provided services (e.g. attacks on the Philips Hue lamp). Conversely, the device can be an attack entry door for the entire system (e.g. the connected cameras used making a D-DoS on DNS servers). Protecting the device does not only mean that we need to protect the way the device is architectured, the way the embedded applications are implemented but also the way the device is manufactured and packaged. In this presentation, we shall first introduce the underlying hardware security issues before focusing on physical attacks like reverse-engineering, side channel analysis and fault attacks. We shall then explain how some of those issues can be addressed with a secure packaging. We shall provide an overview of existing secure packaging technologies and conclude on the remaining challenges for innovative secure packaging solutions.

Biography
Dr Jacques Fournier is a Senior Scientific Advisor in embedded systems’ security at the CEA Leti which he joined 2009. Prior to that, he held several technical positions in the Security Lab of smart card manufacturer Gemalto from 2001 to 2009. Jacques obtained his “Habilitation” from the University of Limoges (FR), a PhD from the University of Cambridge (UK), an MSECE from Georgia Tech (USA) and an engineering degree from the French Grande Ecole Supélec.

12:30
Innovative Adhesive Developments for Next Gen Sensing Modules
  Kily Wu, Product Development Manager, Henkel Electronic Materials
Innovative Adhesive Developments for Next Gen Sensing Modules
Kily Wu

Kily Wu
Product Development Manager
Henkel Electronic Materials

Kily Wu

Abstract
As electronics industry enters a new era of IoT devices, more and more sensing modules are becoming essential to make devices “smart” and "intelligent". Representative ones are camera modules, proximity and ambient light sensors, biometric (3D ID) sensors and MEMS devices. As signal sensing and processing become more advanced and demanding, the adhesives used need to meet more stringent requirements of process flexibility, application accuracy, adhesion strength, drop test and reliability. Henkel evolves together with leading sensing module makers by further developing specialized adhesives for them. For example, in camera modules, low temperature cure and low shrinkage are critical for active alignment and enabling ultra-high image quality. Hybrid resin and curative designs enable cure below 80°C while achieving ultra-low cure shrinkage and excellent adhesion to various substrates. A versatile chemistry toolbox - incl. epoxy, acrylate, silicone and hybrid resins - is used to develop new adhesives for MEMS with a wide modulus range (1 MPa up), stable modulus during operation and high toughness. Through catalyst selection, different UV and/or thermal cure mechanisms are entailed to enable different application processes with higher output. For each chemistry, the adhesive rheology must be tailored to fit challenging aspect ratios using needle dispensing, jetting, printing or laser assisted transfer. For image sensor, lid, cap and stiffener attach and grounding, various levels of electrical and/or thermal conductivity are incorporated by specially developed resin and filler systems. Finally, adhesive FILM is getting preferred over liquids due to advantages in bond line thickness control, tight keep-out zone, low warpage and low stress by low temperature cure, latent catalyst selection and B-stage processing. This presentation will give a clear overview of the sensor assembly challenges AND innovative adhesive solutions to enable Next Gen Sensing Module developments.

Biography
Kily Wu is Product Development Manager with Henkel Electronic Materials and based in Shanghai. His team is developing specialized Semiconductor Die Attach and Sensor Assembly adhesives. Kily has a Master degree in Chemistry with “Macromolecular Chemistry and Physics” as major.

12:55
Enhanced Mechanical Properties of Copper for Fan-Out Wafer Level Packaging Applications
  Ralf Schmidt, R&D Manager, Semiconductor, Atotech Deutschland GmbH
Enhanced Mechanical Properties of Copper for Fan-Out Wafer Level Packaging Applications
Ralf Schmidt

Ralf Schmidt
R&D Manager, Semiconductor
Atotech Deutschland GmbH

Ralf Schmidt

Abstract
Redistribution layers are essential to a variety of packaging technologies, as it is with more RDLs that I/O density is increased. Increasing the I/O count allows for more complex, high speed die to be packaged and supports improved reliability performance. Next generation devices for FOWLP require decreasing the RDL pitch down to 2x2µm. Successful formation and plating of such fine features, however, pose a challenge for both suppliers and manufacturers, with the primary plating challenge being the simultaneous plating of ultra fine L/S, large Cu pads, and filling of microvias with a deposition rate that optimizes throughput. Additionally, the mechanical properties and impurity requirements for the Cu deposition become more difficult to control and optimize with sub 10µm L/S: 1) (large) optimum grain size, polygonal Cu crystal structure for high (ductility) mechanical strength and low resistivity which impacts electrical performance; 2) low internal stress for minimized wafer warpage and good adhesion – both of which impact yield; and 3) low organic co-deposition for minimized micro voiding. Electroplating with standard Cu electrolytes results in micro voiding that amass after thermal cycle testing and may lead to failures or breakages in the Cu metal lines. To overcome this, the bath conditions, additives, and current density should be adjusted to optimize their influence on the deposit properties in terms of impurities and grain size. This paper will discuss how the mechanical properties of Cu can enable higher reliability, and will present plating results achieved with a new electrolyte.

Biography
For the past 6 years Ralf Schmidt has held various roles related to R&D at Atotech Deutschland GmbH, wherein he focused primarily on the development of innovative copper plating processes. He was Team Manager for the central R&D team New Methods & Technologies and has recently assumed the role of R&D Manager Semiconductor Advanced Packaging. He started at Atotech in 2011 in the central R&D team, where he focused on a variety of topics including additives for electrolytic and electroless Cu deposition as well as electrolytic and electroless Ni processes. Ralf recieved his PhD in Chemistry at the Julius-Maximilian University of Würzburg, Germany, where he began his career as scientist for the synthesis of dyes for organic electronics.

13:20
High Performance Thermal Conductive Substrates for Power Module Packaging
  Sejin Im, Global Segment Leader, DuPont
High Performance Thermal Conductive Substrates for Power Module Packaging
Sejin Im

Sejin Im
Global Segment Leader
DuPont

Sejin Im

Abstract
Increased adoption of hybrid and electrical vehicles as well as renewable energy systems are driving the innovation in power module packaging. Thermal substrate, one of the major components of power modules, is not an exception, and technological advancements are necessary to meet increased reliability requirements. Herein, we show that a high-performance power electronic substrate can be designed with newly developed highly thermally conductive polyimide film to address potential issues industry strives to solve. The most widely used ceramic based substrates tend to degrade severely with prolonged thermal cycles, a typical requirement of EVs and HEVs, reducing the reliability and lifetime of the power electronic device. Also, common design of the power module requires many layers that adds thermal resistance at each bonding surface. DuPont’s new Temprion™ Organic Direct Bond Copper (ODBC) has been developed and designed to address aforementioned problems, increasing thermal durability and reliability as well as enabling system layer suppression. Temprion™ ODBC’s dielectric layer, Temprion™ DB film will absorb thermo-mechanical stress from the metals due to CTE mismatch, dramatically improving durability of the system. In addition, various kinds of metals including Cu and Al can be easily bonded to Temprion™ DB films through simple process. There are no thickness limitations on bonding metal sheets and metal attached at the bottom can be used as an integrated heat sink/baseplate. This presentation will provide an overview of the power module market, highlighting current challenges and alternative solutions to address them.

Biography
Sejin has over 10 years of experience in the automotive and chemical industry in various disciplines including business planning and strategy, product management and engineering. Currently he works at DuPont with teams and partners to help the industry solve one of its biggest challenges – thermal management – with DuPont’s latest technology. Sejin holds a BSME from University of Wisconsin at Madison and an MBA from Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University.

13:45 Closing Remark & End