Tuesday, November 14, 2017
Session

Metrology

Chair Markus Pfeffer, Group Manager, Fraunhofer IISB
Markus Pfeffer

Markus Pfeffer
Group Manager
Fraunhofer IISB

Markus Pfeffer

Biography
Dr. Markus Pfeffer (M): holds a diploma in Electrical Engineering and a PhD (Dr.-Ing.) with specialization in manufacturing optimization both from the University of Erlangen- Nu-remberg. Since 2002 he is with Fraunhofer IISB in the department Semiconductor Manufac-turing Equipment and Methods. He is leading the group Manufacturing Control with a strong focus on equipment control, contamination control, manufacturing optimisation, equipment assessment and discrete event simulation. He was/is involved in several national and interna-tional cooperative R&D projects, e. g. FLYING WAFER, PULLNANO, IMPROVE, EEMI450, SEA-NET, SEAL, NEREID, EuroCPS and SEA4KET in a variety of functions.

10:00 Introduction
10:05
Advanced Electron Microscopy Imaging and Analysis of Low-dimensional nanomaterials
  Valeria Nicolosi, Professor of Nanomaterials and Advanced Microscopy, Trinity College Dublin
Advanced Electron Microscopy Imaging and Analysis of Low-dimensional nanomaterials
Valeria Nicolosi

Valeria Nicolosi
Professor of Nanomaterials and Advanced Microscopy
Trinity College Dublin

Valeria Nicolosi

Abstract
Low-dimensional nanostructured materials such as organic and inorganic nanotubes, nanowires and platelets and nanodevices are potentially useful in a number of areas of nanoscience and nanotechnology due to their remarkable mechanical, electrical and thermal properties. To make real applications truly feasible, however, it is crucial to fully characterize the nanostructures on the atomic scale and correlate this information with their physical and chemical properties. Advances in aberration-corrected optics in electron microscopy have revolutionised the way to characterise nano-materials, opening new frontiers for materials science. With the recent advances in nanostructure processability, electron microscopes are now revealing the structure of the individual components of nanomaterials, atom by atom. Here we will present an overview of very different low-dimensional materials issues, showing what aberration-corrected electron microscopy can do for materials scientists.

Biografie
Prof. Nicolosi is the Chair of Nanomaterials and Advanced Microscopy in Trinity College Dublin, a PI in the SFI funded Centre AMBER and Director of the Advanced Microscopy Laboratory. She has published more than 150 high-impact-papers and won numerous awards: RDS/Intel Prize for Nanoscience 2012, World Economic Forum Young Scientist 2013, WMB Woman in Technology Award 2013, SFI President of Ireland Young Researcher Award 2014, SFI Irish Early Stage Researcher 2016. Prof. Nicolosi has been awarded 5 European Research Council Awards: a €1.5m Starting Grant in 2011, 3 Proof-of-Concept top-up grants to bring results of frontier research closer to the market, and a €2.5m Consolidator Grant in 2016, bringing her total research funding awarded in the past 5 years to over €12 million.

10:30
Nanoimaging and metrology of Nanopatterns under Opaque layers Using Subsurface Ultrasonic Resonance Force Microscopy
  Hamed Sadeghian, Principal Scientist, TNO
Nanoimaging and metrology of Nanopatterns under Opaque layers Using Subsurface Ultrasonic Resonance Force Microscopy
Hamed Sadeghian

Hamed Sadeghian
Principal Scientist
TNO

Hamed Sadeghian

Abstract
Nondestructive subsurface nanoimaging of buried nanostructures is considered to be extremely challenging and is essential for the reliable manufacturing of nanotechnology products such as three-dimensional (3D) transistors, 3D NAND memory, and future quantum electronics. In this talk, the development of a subsurface nanoimaging technique, called subsurface ultrasonic resonance force microscopy (SSURFM) is reported. The capability and versatility of this method is demonstrated by the subsurface imaging of various samples including rigid structures buried under a soft matrix , rigid structures buried under multiple opaque layers , and rigid structures under a rigid matrix . The experimental results provide possible new industrial metrology and inspection solutions for nanostructures buried below the surface and through optically non-transparent layers.

Biografie
Dr. Hamed Sadeghian received his PhD (Cum Laude) in 2010 from Delft University of Technology. He then continued his career as a Postdoctoral fellow, where he developed several sensing and instrumentation method. He is currently a Principal Scientist at TNO, leading the program NOMI (Nano-Optomechatronics Instrumentations) and the research program 3D nanomanufacturing Instruments at TNO. In 2014 he also received his MBA degree from Leuven Vlerick Business School, Belgium. Dr. Sadeghian holds more than 40 patents, and has authored more than 60 technical papers and co-authored a book. He is a member of editorial advisory board of Sensors & Transducers Journal. He is also a member of technical committee of SENSORDEVICES conference since 2010 till present. He is also a recipient of several best paper awards. In 2012 he was awarded as “TNO excellent researcher”.

10:55
Next generation metrology obstacles will be overcome by MDM (Multi-Dimension Metrology)
  Yoram Uziel, Tecnnology Director, Applied Materials
Next generation metrology obstacles will be overcome by MDM (Multi-Dimension Metrology)
Yoram Uziel

Yoram Uziel
Tecnnology Director
Applied Materials

Yoram Uziel

Abstract
The metrology equipment developers need to prepare new technologies to deal with the following major issues: - A need to accurately measure objects of just a few nanometers with sub 1 nanometer accuracy - An ability to extract signals from under-layers to reveal hidden defects and to characterize hidden elements in the upcoming, complex 3D structures - An ability to detect materials with a small sample, having a sensitivity of just a few atoms In addition to the above requirements, our metrology equipment need to perform this task at an acceptable throughput X CoO (cost of ownership) The MDM concept will be assessed in a few consortia. The idea is to overcome the difficult requirements by smart, rapid metrology data collection, from both in-line and off-line equipment, in order to generate a reliable process control indication which will comply with nano-electronic production requirements. The lecture will describe the difficulties and possible paths to the solution.

Biografie
Yoram Uziel is a technology Director at Applied Materials, IPC/PDC group. He has a BsC in mechanical engineering and an MsC in business management. Yoram has more than 30 years of semiconductor metrology equipment experience and more than 20 related patents.

11:20
Hybrid Metrology 2.0: From Metrology to Information Technology
  Avron Ger, VP, Strategic Partnership Programs, Nova Measuring Instruments
Hybrid Metrology 2.0: From Metrology to Information Technology
Avron Ger

Avron Ger
VP, Strategic Partnership Programs
Nova Measuring Instruments

Avron Ger

Abstract
As semiconductor device architectures have become more complex, with ever-tightening process control requirements, metrology solutions have become more resourceful and innovative. One such solution has been hybrid metrology, which has been defined as the practice of combining measurements from multiple equipment types in order to enable or improve measurement performance. But with advancements not only in metrology, but also computing and machine learning, the combining of data from multiple sources has quickly grown in terms of its sophistication, as well as its benefit to the end-user. Thus, it seems increasingly appropriate that the definition of hybrid metrology be expanded to the practice of combining data from multiple sources of information in order to improve measurement performance. With this interpretation, we present several hybrid metrology solutions that have been developed with leading semiconductor device manufacturers to solve some of their most challenging applications. These solutions utilize hybrid techniques that range from “conventional” hybrid metrology between scatterometry and X-ray based metrologies, to more diversified hybrid methods that rely on information from the complex geometry of the structure, machine learning, and other advanced computing technologies. Collectively, these next-generation hybrid methods enable the solution of many applications that were previously beyond the reach of metrologists’ best methods. In this work, such applications, along with their innovative solutions, will be documented. The flexibility of the hybrid methods—applied to both front-end and back-end applications—will also be made evident.

Biografie
 B.Sc. in electronic engineering from the Technion – Israel Institute of Technology  More than 21 years of experience in the semiconductor industry, including product development, service and application, mainly in Process control related positions.  Held several management positions in Nova, including US service management, Product and algorithms development, and the world wide application group management  Leads Strategic cooperation activities and joint development programs with customers, partners and research centers.

11:45
X-ray Metrology: Challenges and Solutions in the 3D era
  Juliette van der Meer, Head of X-ray Application Development, Bruker
X-ray Metrology: Challenges and Solutions in the 3D era
Juliette van der Meer

Juliette van der Meer
Head of X-ray Application Development
Bruker

Juliette van der Meer

Abstract
X-rays are non-contacting, non-destructive and suitable to probe 3D nanoscale features. Therefore, X-ray metrology is used in multiple processing steps for finFET logic and 3D memory structures, providing information on critical dimensions, film thickness, strain and composition. High Resolution XRD (HRXRD) works from first principles and thus no standards are needed. It is a powerful technique to determine strain in epitaxial layers. Microspot measurements are enabled by the latest advances in brilliant small spot X-ray sources and detector technology. µXRF is a volumetric method. It measures atoms, regardless the complexity of the shape. It is capable to measure the thickness of (ultra-)thin films and also the sidewalls around fins. Crystalline defects in the substrate can cause cracks and slip. The latter is problematic and may lead to yield loss, because the overlay budget is continuously decreasing due to multiple patterning schemes. Cracks can eventually cause wafer breakage. XRD Imaging (XRDI) detects defects through the wafer. Bruker offers metrology platforms for all introduced X-ray technologies.

Biografie
Juliette holds a MSc in Geochemistry –direction igneous petrology (2003) and a PhD in Thermodynamics –on molten nuclear fuel salts (2006) from Utrecht University, Netherlands. Then she took a swing. Via a post-doctoral research project on porous silica using various X-ray measurement techniques at CEA Marcoule in France she moved to the field of X-ray metrology for semiconductors in which she works since 2008. 2008-2015: Bruker AXS, Karlsruhe, Germany. Application scientist XRF and thin film metrology 2015-present: Bruker Semiconductor, Karlsruhe, Germany. Head of X-ray Application Development and Product Manager TXRF

12:10 TBD
12:35 End