Wednesday, October 26, 2016
 

Agenda

14:15
Towards Zero Power – Smart Systems Make All the Difference
  Joachim Wagner, Deputy Director, Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Solid State Physics IAF
Towards Zero Power – Smart Systems Make All the Difference
Joachim Wagner

Joachim Wagner
Deputy Director
Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Solid State Physics IAF

Joachim Wagner

Abstract
Micro-/nanoelectronics and MEMS have become the most important key enabling technologies for all branches. Sensors, actuators and electronic signal processing are used everywhere. Communication has become an important part of daily life, and a dramatic increase in machine-to-machine communication is expected by introduction of “industry 4.0”. However, power consumption of information technologies is now becoming a major issue in a world where an upcoming shortage of resources is expected and sustainability has become a need. Fraunhofer Microelectronics has just decided to focus its strategy on this power issue and to concentrate research and development efforts on the reduction of energy consumption. Combining the technological expertise of the 18 member institutes, the development of smart systems with ultra-low power consumption and energy harvesting as well as of highly efficient power electronics will help to solve the power issue, one of the major societal challenges of today.

Biografie
Joachim Wagner received the Ph.D. degree in physics from the University in Stuttgart, Germany, in 1982. From 1982 to 1984 he worked at the “Max-Planck-Institut für Festkörperforschung”, Stuttgart, Germany, in the group of Prof. M. Cardona before joining the Fraunhofer-Institute for Applied Solid State Physics, Freiburg, Germany, in 1985. There he is currently Deputy Director and Division Director, responsible for the institute´s business units. He is also Professor at the Institute of Physics of the University of Freiburg and an associated member of the Materials Research Center Freiburg (FMF). His current research interests include III/V-semiconductor based optoelectronic devices in particular for the infrared spectral range, as well as their integration into modules and sensing systems. He is author or coauthor of 470 scientific publications including several review papers and book chapters.

14:20
CMOS Integrated Microsystems: A Cost Efficient Basis for Smart Systems
  Andreas Goehlich, Head of the Department CMOS and Microsystem Technology, Fraunhofer Institute for Microelectronic Circuits and Systems IMS
CMOS Integrated Microsystems: A Cost Efficient Basis for Smart Systems
Andreas Goehlich

Andreas Goehlich
Head of the Department CMOS and Microsystem Technology
Fraunhofer Institute for Microelectronic Circuits and Systems IMS

Andreas Goehlich

Abstract
In view of the upcoming challenges and opportunities of the internet of things (IoT), the industry 4.0 and the social challenges as the aging society an increasing number and diversity of sensors and actors will be used in future in electronic smart systems. These will require suitable cost effective and flexible technological platforms. CMOS-integrated microsystems can be the perfect basis for such future applications, connecting intelligence to functionality. The monolithic integration of micro- or nanostructures i.e. MEMS or NEMS (micro/nano-electromechanical systems) on pre-processed CMOS-substrates is a promising approach for the next generation of intelligent sensors and actuators. Post-CMOS-processing allows the 3D-integration of sensors and actuators on top of the read-out circuitry thus enabling a considerable reduction of chip area. The decoupling of the complex manufacture of the CMOS-substrate from the processing of the functional MEMS/NEMS-device allows to concentrate the development efforts on the functionality. In this way short and cost effective development cycles for new sensors and actuators are made possible. In the Fraunhofer Group for Microelectronics a multitude of complementary competences of different institutes is bundled, that target to the integration of MEMS and NEMS on intelligent CMOS-substrates as a technological platform for the next generation of sensors and actors. Some examples of ongoing technology developments are presented that cover different applications such as sensors for industrial application in harsh environment, integrated energy harvesters, CMOS-integrated optical devices and integrated nanostructures on CMOS.

Biografie
Andreas Goehlich has studied physics at University of Essen and made is doctoral thesis in the field of laser aided diagnostics of sputtering processes in 1994. Subsequently he worked as a scientific assistant at University Essen. After a postdoc research position at University Innsbruck he joined Fraunhofer IMS in 2002 as a scientific coworker in the field of the development and failure analysis of CMOS processes. Since 2011 he headed the microsystem development group at IMS specialized on MEMS and MEMS-CMOS integration. Since 2016 he heads the department CMOS- und microsystem technology at Fraunhofer IMS with focus on MEMS-CMOS integration, high-temperature-CMOS and technology for image sensors.

14:40
III-V Semiconductor Devices – Full Potential to be Unleashed by Heterogeneous Integration
  Joachim Wagner, Deputy Director, Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Solid State Physics IAF
III-V Semiconductor Devices – Full Potential to be Unleashed by Heterogeneous Integration
Joachim Wagner

Joachim Wagner
Deputy Director
Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Solid State Physics IAF

Joachim Wagner

Abstract
III-V compound semiconductors offer unique physical properties which allow to realize electronic and also optoelectronic devices with properties far superior to those of their silicon based counterparts. This includes ultra-high-frequency (up to almost 1 THz) low-noise amplifiers, high-power broadband amplifiers and switches, high-efficiency light emitters as well as MEMS devices exploiting the piezoelectric properties of certain III-V materials. On the other hand, processing technology for III-V materials is less advanced than for e.g. silicon CMOS and, furthermore, the maximum wafer size of III-V substrates is limited to 6 inch the most. To combine III-V technologies and devices with e.g. silicon CMOS, heterogeneous integration is an attractive approach. Here we present examples of the integration of GaN-based power electronics with silicon, either by direct growth of GaN on silicon or by heterogeneous integration via transfer printing of GaN power transistor chips onto silicon. Furthermore, we report on high-performance mm-wave Radar modules based on metamorphic GaInAs high-electron-mobility transistors (HEMTs) and a 3D mm-wave MIMO camera based thereon. This mm-wave Radar technology will benefit greatly from advanced heterogeneous integration concepts, which will allow to integrate GaN-based transmitter with GaInAs receiver chips onto silicon in order to reduce size, weight and also cost. As a third example we will report on the integration of InP-based quantum cascade lasers with silicon-based optical MEMS scanning gratings, which allows the realization of a compact and fast scanning MIR laser source for spectroscopic sensing, diagnostics and process analysis.

Biografie
Joachim Wagner received the Ph.D. degree in physics from the University in Stuttgart, Germany, in 1982. From 1982 to 1984 he worked at the “Max-Planck-Institut für Festkörperforschung”, Stuttgart, Germany, in the group of Prof. M. Cardona before joining the Fraunhofer-Institute for Applied Solid State Physics, Freiburg, Germany, in 1985. There he is currently Deputy Director and Division Director, responsible for the institute´s business units. He is also Professor at the Institute of Physics of the University of Freiburg and an associated member of the Materials Research Center Freiburg (FMF). His current research interests include III/V-semiconductor based optoelectronic devices in particular for the infrared spectral range, as well as their integration into modules and sensing systems. He is author or coauthor of 470 scientific publications including several review papers and book chapters.

15:00 Advanced Technologies and Devices for Energy Efficient Systems
  Stefan E. Schulz, Deputy Director and Head of the Department Back-end of Line, Faunhofer Institute for Electronic Nano Systems ENAS, Chemnitz
15:20
Smart Systems as Enabler for Industrie 4.0 and Internet of Things
  Michael Scholles, Head of Business Development & Strategy, Fraunhofer Institute for Photonic Microsystems IPMS
Smart Systems as Enabler for Industrie 4.0 and Internet of Things
Michael Scholles

Michael Scholles
Head of Business Development & Strategy
Fraunhofer Institute for Photonic Microsystems IPMS

Michael Scholles

Abstract
Internet of Things and Industrie 4.0 are current megatrends that promise enormous chances for the European industry, especially for markets like plant construction and engineering, automotive, electronics industry and industrial automation. Besides intelligent software, optimized hardware components are required so that the digital transformation of the industry becomes a success and competitiveness of the European industry can be ensured. Electronic data and signal processing by cyber physical systems requires an interface to the real world. Micro Electromechanical Systems (MEMS) comprising the sensory element as well as read-out and driving circuitry, realized as ASIC, are already widely established in certain markets like automotive and consumer industry. However, they are also of great importance for Industrie 4.0. They collect physical or chemical information via the sensing element, the electronics transforms the signal into a usable form and by means of analog and digital interfaces information is transferred to the central processing unit. Applications in the field of Internet of Things and Industrie 4.0 often have special requirements like low energy consumption and monolithic integration of all functionality in order to minimize costs. Here, additional research and development is necessary to provide solutions that meet those demands. Systems to be used for Industrie 4.0 shall typically act autonomously. Hence, a wireless data transmission is preferred. Since power consumption of the entire system is dominated by RF transmission, alternative solutions are sought. One promising candidate is optical wireless transmission which achieves much higher bandwidth than RF modules. Sending a given amount of data from a sensor node to the central processing by optical transmission becomes much more energy efficient. The talk will feature recent developments of the Fraunhofer Microelectronics Group in all mentioned areas.

Biografie
Michael Scholles received the Diploma in electrical engineering and the Dr.-Ing degree, both from Gerhard-Mercator-University Duisburg (Germany), in 1990 and 1996, respectively. From 1990 to 1995 he has been with the Fraunhofer Institute of Microelectronic Circuits and Systems (Fraunhofer IMS) Duisburg, where he was working on biology-oriented signal processing systems and multi-processor systems. Since 1996, he has been head of the “Parallel Signal Processing” group at Fraunhofer IMS Dresden, which was focused on the development of embedded systems for high performance digital signal processing and networking with special interest on IEEE 1394 technology. In 2003, he became Division Director “Electronic Systems” at the then founded Fraunhofer Institute for Photonic Microsystems (Fraunhofer IPMS). From July 2005 until November 2011, he has been Business Unit Manager “Sensor and Actuator Systems” at Fraunhofer IPMS. The Business Unit comprises all activities of the institute concerning sensor and sensor system development, optics design, development of analog and mixed-signal integrated circuits, and system integration including data communication systems. Since January 2011, he is responsible for “Business Development & Strategy” at Fraunhofer IPMS.

15:40
Requirements & Challenges for Heterogeneous System Integration
  Jürgen Wolf, Head of Department, Management ASSID, Fraunhofer Institute for Reliability and Microintegration IZM
Requirements & Challenges for Heterogeneous System Integration
Jürgen Wolf

Jürgen Wolf
Head of Department, Management ASSID
Fraunhofer Institute for Reliability and Microintegration IZM

Jürgen Wolf

Abstract
Traditional single packaging solutions are not able to deal with the required system specifications related to high functionality, miniaturization, high speed data transmission, and multi-device integration. There is a need of highly miniaturized and flexible systems solutions that can be applied in various sectors and meet the requirements of current application trends especially in the realms of Internet of Things (IoT), Cyber Physical Systems (CPS), Ambient Assisted Living (AAL) as well as information & communication, logistics, security, automotive, health care and industrial electronics (Industry 4.0). Heterogeneous integration of multiple electronic devices is a key enabling technology which covers wafer level e.g. CSP, 3D, 2.5 integration as well as board level approaches. The presentation will give an overview of current heterogeneous integration technologies under the perspective of “More Than Moore” through Heterogeneous System Integration. 3D integration with Through-Silicon-Vias (TSV) is one of the most important topics in current packaging and interconnection.

Biografie
M. Juergen Wolf received a M.S. degree in Electrical Engineering. In 1994, M. Juergen joined Fraunhofer Institute for Reliability and Microintegration IZM and worked e.g. as group & project manager in the field of wafer level packaging and system in package. Since 2011 he is head of the department Wafer Level System Integration and also coordinates and manages “ASSID - All Silicon System Integration Dresden” with its 300 mm WL process line. He manages as well as participates in a number of research projects on European and international level. Wolf is European representative in the technical working group Assembly & Packaging of ITRS, board member of EURIPIDES as well as member of IEEE and SMTA. He has (co) authored numerous scientific papers and reports in the field of microelectronic packaging and holds a number of patents.

16:00
Modules and Systems for Improved Smart and Healthy Living
  Thomas Knieling, Deputy Department Chief of the Module Integration Group, Fraunhofer Institute for Silicon Technology ISIT
Modules and Systems for Improved Smart and Healthy Living
Thomas Knieling

Thomas Knieling
Deputy Department Chief of the Module Integration Group
Fraunhofer Institute for Silicon Technology ISIT

Thomas Knieling

Abstract
Smart and Healthy Living at Fraunhofer Group for Microelectronics means doing research into all the ways that technology can support our lives and our work in a modern world. Fraunhofer research covers the whole chain starting with developing new materials for getting functional or easily cleanable and clean remaining surfaces, the development of Silicon based ICs and of electronic modules made by using heterogeneous integration and hybrid electronics methods, means the combination of traditional Silicon manufacturing or PCB soldering combined with new techniques like organic, flexible electronics. High 3D integration, wafer level fan out packaging and encapsulation are now on their way to be proved and qualified for mass production. Electronics substrates are no longer consisting only of rigid PCBs - today all kinds of conductive and non-conductive foil materials, stretchables and textiles are assembled and even being printed or coated by electronics parts, sensors, light and energy sources as well as by suited encapsulation or barrier layers. With these techniques amazing new products can and have already been created: For instance Fitness T-Shirts and functional sensor insoles for obtaining health parameters like heart rate, motion and gait analysis are only few examples. But only getting data is not enough: Visual, acoustic and even haptic feedbacks are provided instantly for supplying the user with valuable data of his actual performance and how to improve it by intuitive learning. This presentation provides an actual overview of Fraunhofer Microelectronics research in Smart & Healthy Living and focuses on all electronic assistance as a symbiotic cooperation between humans and technology.

Biografie
Thomas Knieling studied physics at the Max-Planck Institut für Strömungsphysik in Göttingen, Germany in the field of particle optics. Afterwards he prepared his PhD thesis at the University of Bremen (IMSAS), Germany, in the areas of microtechnology, microoptics and surface science. Next he worked as a scientist at the Fraunhofer IPMS in Dresden, covering topics in microoptics and display technologies. Since 2009 he is deputy department chief of the module integration group at the Fraunhofer ISIT in Itzehoe, Germany, where he is working on quality and reliability issues of PCBs and MEMS as well as on printed electronics for medical and sports applications. Moreover he is leading the business field of Wearables and Printed Electronics.

16:20 End