Wednesday, October 26, 2016
 

Agenda

Chair Mart Graef, Strategic Programme Manager, TU Delft
Mart Graef

Mart Graef
Strategic Programme Manager
TU Delft

Mart Graef

Biography
Mart Graef is strategic program manager at the faculty of Electrical Engineering, Mathematics and Computer Science at Delft University of Technology (TU Delft) in The Netherlands. In this position, he develops technology partnerships with companies, institutes and universities, often within the framework of national and European cooperative projects. He participated in initiatives aimed at defining strategies and technology roadmaps in nanoelectronics, such as NANO-TEC, ENI2 and the ITRS. He is a member of the International Roadmap Committee, which guides the International Roadmap for Devices and Systems (IRDS). He is the chair of the AENEAS Scientific Council.

11:45 Introduction
11:50
Towards Smart and Connected Urban centres
  Jessica Mc Carthy, Senior Research Scientist, Intel Research and Development
Towards Smart and Connected Urban centres
Jessica Mc Carthy

Jessica Mc Carthy
Senior Research Scientist
Intel Research and Development

Jessica Mc Carthy

Abstract
We are experiencing the largest demographic population shift in history of mankind, driven by the mass movement of people from rural to urban centres. This mass movement to urban centres shall drive the requirement for adaptive and responsive infrastructure which will be paramount for capacity, prosperity and liveability of our future cities A key technology trend which shall enable these future urban centres is the Internet of Things (IoT) driven by the explosion in growth of connected things / devices, projected to reach 50 billion+ devices by 2020. This talk shall cover the future challenges, technology trends and opportunities for technology companies with these new Urban IoT centres of the future.

Biografie
Jessica McCarthy is a senior research scientist with Intel Labs Europe. She is currently with the Internet of things system research Lab where her focus it on the future of IoT technologies and research. Jessica is currently driving a future cities research program with Trinity College Dublin. Jessica has been actively involved in the European Framework Program (FP) working on various projects such as SLA@SOI and PLANTCockpit. Jessica has been with Intel since 2005 and brings with her over 15 years of IT Industry experience. Jessica others areas of interest include IOT, sensing, cloud computing, infrastructure management, enterprise architecture amongst others. Jessica graduated with a B.Sc. in Computer Science and Mathematics from the National University of Ireland Maynooth 1999, she was awarded an honours M.Sc. in Computing (IT) from the Dublin Institute of Technology 2008 and is currently pursuing her PhD with Trinity College Dublin. She holds a number of patents in the field of IoT.

12:10
The Right Security for Smart Cities
  Juergen Spaenkuch, Vice President of the Chipcard & Security Division, Infineon Technologies AG
The Right Security for Smart Cities
Juergen Spaenkuch

Juergen Spaenkuch
Vice President of the Chipcard & Security Division
Infineon Technologies AG

Juergen Spaenkuch

Abstract
A smart city is based on the vision to connect a multitude of information and communication (ICT) technology solutions with physical devices in order to manage a cities assets in an intelligent way. These assets can include schools, hospitals, local governmental information systems, waste management, power plants and water supply networks, all of which are managed through an ICT network. This comes along with vast amounts of data being collected and then transferred, processed and analyzed, including data on individual citizens and critical infrastructure data. To protect this data and therefore enable the operation of the different systems and services, data security and system integrity are essential for the successful implementation of the Internet of Things in city infrastructures. Smart Cities with their complexity come with a large amount of attack surfaces and one of the main weaknesses that could be turned around is the current lack of smart technology including strong security functionalities. Current technology often comes without security functionality or is based on pure software-based security. Unfortunately, software - due to its nature - bears several significant weaknesses. Software is written code, and code can be read and analyzed. And once it is analyzed, it can be modified to the requirements of an attacker and system integrity can be broken. However, software can be protected by hardware: hardware protects the processing and storage of code by using encryption, fault and manipulation detection, and by providing secured data storage. This has been proven by extensive experience from the areas of trusted computing and the use of secure elements in mobile phones. Following the same principles, hardware-based security tailored to ICT requirements provides a trust anchor for digitized and connected cities and helps to secure citizens privacy, efficient operations and public safety as well as economic stability.

Biografie
Juergen Spaenkuch Division Vice President Chip Card & Security (CCS) Infineon Technologies AG - born on April 22, 1969 - in Rastatt, Germany - married, 2 children Juergen Spaenkuch studied at the University of Applied Sciences in Karlsruhe from 1991 to 1997 and holds a Master degree in informatics. He started his professional career at Siemens AG in the Memory Products division of the semiconductors business unit, which later became Infineon Technologies AG. In the years thereafter, Mr. Spaenkuch held various positions in logistics, technical marketing and product management and also had managerial responsibilities for the Automotive and Chip Card Divisions of Infineon. In 2008, Juergen Spaenkuch became the head of the Embedded Security product segment of the Chip Card Division. Since July 1, 2011, he is the Vice President and General Manager of the business line Platform Security within the Chip Card & Security (CCS) Division.

12:30
How understanding application-based challenges centered around ICT leads to pinpointing challenges and opportunities for the semiconductor industry.
  Patrick Grosa, Project Manager "fast techtransfer", TU Dresden
How understanding application-based challenges centered around ICT leads to pinpointing challenges and opportunities for the semiconductor industry.
Patrick Grosa

Patrick Grosa
Project Manager "fast techtransfer"
TU Dresden

Patrick Grosa

Abstract
Making cities smarter means a great deal to the communications industry. Thousands, even millions, of devices and a changing paradigm from content consumption, and recently content generation, towards the control and steering era will change the face of cities around the globe. Smart Grids, V2X communications, 5G, (mobile edge) clouds, Big Data, Industry 4.0, IoT, IoE, and many more, are only a few buzzwords wandering around these times. However, the next step in ICT is not limited to the communication industry but rather a convergence of multiple, previously separate, industry fields centering around ICT. Upcoming visions, ideas and business models of the future will change routines, daily life and finally the society. The understanding of these applications and their challenges, especially from communications point of view, will lead to the separation of wheat from the chaff for industries and companies, which is in particular true for the semiconductor industry. The better the challenges of others are understood, the better the semiconductor industry can prepare and define their own challenges. Different application yield to different requirements in terms of costs, energy consumption, speed, latency, environmental aspect, supported technologies and so on. This talk should clarify the vision of smart cities in the near and far future and should help to foster innovation through the identification of challenges but more importantly opportunities technology- and business-wise.

Biografie
Patrick Grosa graduated in Information Systems Engineering from Technische Universität Dresden in 2009. Afterwards, he joined the Vodafone Chair for Wireless Communications, where he wrote his PhD thesis on protograph-based LDPC convolutional codes under the supervision of Prof. Gerhard Fettweis. During his time at the chair, he was working in German government funded and industry projects. He was also the major organizer of the IEEE Vehicular Technology Conference (VTC2013-Spring in Dresden), the semi-annual flagship conference of the IEEE Vehicular Technology Society. Since July 2015, he is involved in the management of the cluster project “fast – fast actuators sensors and receivers” within the framework program “Twenty20 – Partnership for Innovation” of the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF), which is funded with 45 Mio EUR. Besides being involved in the strategical advancement of the cluster, his main focus is the innovation management and technology transfer in the cluster. fast, which is coordinated by Prof. Ellinger and Prof. Fettweis, deals with basic research on real-time systems and their applications in the field of connectivity, manufacturing, traffic, and health. Furthermore, Patrick is pursuing an Executive MBA in the part-time MBA program from HHL Graduate School of Management, Leipzig, Germany.

12:50 FDSOI: workhorse for IoT
  Andreia Cathelin, STMicroelectronics
13:10 Smart system integration
  Stefan Schulz, FhG ENAS
13:30 Quantum Computing with Nanowires
  Erik Bakker, TU Delft
13:50 Summary / End