Tuesday, October 25, 2016
 

Chair Oliver Pyper, Senior Manager R&D&I Programmes, Infineon Technologies Dresden GmbH
Oliver Pyper

Oliver Pyper
Senior Manager R&D&I Programmes
Infineon Technologies Dresden GmbH

Oliver Pyper

Biography
Dr. Oliver Pyper (m) holds a Diploma in chemistry and a PhD in natural science. After investigating basic principles of electrochemical effects in thin film oxides at the Technical University of Berlin, he joined Infineon Technologies Dresden in 2000. Until 2005 he was responsible for a module of the DRAM-technology and managing several projects for optimising current technologies and fast ramp of new technologies. In 2005 he took new challenges in the field of semiconductor production by managing several projects to improve the manufacturing landscape. Since 2007 he is responsible for programmes for research, development and innovation at Infineon Dresden. Beside this, he is leading several R&D-projects funded by national and EU bodies.

10:15 Introduction
10:20
Redundant sensor architectures for safety critical applications
  Vincenzo Sacco, Global Functional Safety Manager, Melexis
Redundant sensor architectures for safety critical applications
Vincenzo Sacco

Vincenzo Sacco
Global Functional Safety Manager
Melexis

Vincenzo Sacco

Abstract
Over the last decades, the industry has provided a steady improvement in the safety of automobiles. Advances in modern electronics have accelerated the number and features of safety systems. Semiconductor devices, sensors, actuators and computer controlled systems with complex software are integral to these system designs. This increasing complexity drives the need for a new paradigm for safety systems development and engineering to achieve their function. ISO-26262 "Road vehicles — Functional Safety" provides appropriate standardized requirements, processes and an automotive-specific risk-based approach to determine integrity levels, also known as Automotive Safety Integrity Levels or ASILs. ASILs are used to specify applicable requirements of the ISO-26262 standard so as to avoid unreasonable residual risk; Smart integrated sensors in particular, are used extensively in automotive safety-critical applications (throttle valve position, braking and acceleration pedal angle, object distance detection for emergency braking, ignition key switch and many others …). In vision of the increase complexity and application scenario, the functional and safety requirements allocated to these sensors demand therefore innovative architectures. This paper/presentation will review some of the existing redundant sensor architectures and improvements proposals needed to meet the new stringent safety targets in vision of the autonomous driving era.

Biografie
Dr. Vincenzo Sacco Granted his PhD in 2006 jointly from University of Catania (Italy) and LIRMM in Montpelier (France) with a thesis on magnetic micro-sensors in MEMS and CMOS technologies. He has authored 45 papers and 3 patents. He has developed his career in Melexis as Analog Design Engineer (1y), Project Manager (3y), Senior Project Manager / Team Leaders (3y), and finally Global Functional Safety Manager (3y). Today He is leading the Functional Safety Competency Centre (FSCC) in Melexis, responsible to implement ISO26262 and to develop Functional Safety competencies across Melexis. He is also responsible to enhance System Engineering competencies and methods

10:45
0ppm failure rate for automotive microelectronics- no chance without extensive and proactive physical and chemical analysis.
  Gerald Dallmann, Division Manager Microelectronics, SGS INSTITUT FRESENIUS GmbH; Koenigsbruecker LAndstr. 161
0ppm failure rate for automotive microelectronics- no chance without extensive and proactive physical and chemical analysis.
Gerald Dallmann

Gerald Dallmann
Division Manager Microelectronics
SGS INSTITUT FRESENIUS GmbH; Koenigsbruecker LAndstr. 161

Gerald Dallmann

Abstract
System and chip qualification and production release procedures are based today on the AEC Q100 standard. These documents describe a set of tests which are specific to certain failure mechanisms, induced f.e. by higher temperature. However, these tests are today very limited for the estimation of failure rates or even to demonstrate a zero failure rate, as required by the automotive industry. First, the tests are performed on a very limited number of samples (e.g. 77) not allowing to show a low ppm failure level. Second, the tests assume a certain failure mode acceleration by f.e. high application temperature. These models are very often not known and failures show a fully other behavior and acceleration in the field (due to combination of technology excursions, defects, combined voltage, current, temperature, humidity and mechanical stress). Third, the component validation after test is performed only by electrical testing. Physical failure analysis after the test is not required and mostly not performed by the chip and system manufacturers. Very often degradation and aging processes occur, not leading to the chip failure at the end of the test, f.e. formation of intermetallic phases in bonds, formation of cracks, delamination and corrosion. So these issues are not detected and not analyzed and can lead to field failures. The physical and chemical analysis methods and tools (like XPS, AES, TOF-SIMS) are highly developed to analyze materials and failure modes in semiconductor and system level technologies. The application of these analysis techniques after climate, voltage or mechanical stress application can create a much deeper view inside chip and system weaknesses and failure modes. The talk shows some typical failure mechanisms found in a lab as service provider for many different companies. Some weak spots are discussed with recommendations for improvements.

Biografie
Division Manager at SGS Institut Fresenius GmbH in Dresden, Germany, since 2009. Main focus on material and failure analysis of semiconductor devices of client companies. 1995 Director for technology development at Siemens, Infineon, Qimonda, responsible for process integration, yield enhancement and material and technology development of DRAMs. 1990 Product manager microelectronics at Institut Fresenius in Dresden. Main Focus on failure analysis of semiconductor devices. 1986 Department manager electron microscopy at Zentrum Mikroelektronik Dresden (ZMD). 1986 Diploma in Microelectronics Technology and Semiconductor Devices.

11:10
System simulation – The answer to ADAS requirements for holistic simulations of heterogeneous systems
  Christian Kehrer, Head of Sales DACH, ESI ITI GmbH
System simulation – The answer to ADAS requirements for holistic simulations of heterogeneous systems
Christian Kehrer

Christian Kehrer
Head of Sales DACH
ESI ITI GmbH

Christian Kehrer

Abstract
Throughout the last couple of years, “autonomous driving” has grown from a buzzword describing a far future to the next big thing in today’s automotive world. In the wake of this evolution, the main challenges are shifting accordingly: What is the best way to combine two worlds that have been separated so far, at least to a certain extent, with sensors and corresponding electronics on the one hand and “classical” physical components on the other? The separation of these two worlds is mainly based on their specific development processes and the tools used within these processes. Sensors are often developed with proprietary software tools that have their own language and no standardized interfaces. The development of mechanical or hydraulic components on the other hand is still based on physical prototypes most of the time, although frontloading (i.e. virtualization and simulation) becomes more and more relevant. To meet the requirements of next-generation autonomous driver assistance systems (ADAS), simulations need to incorporate all of these aspects as sensors and mechatronic components with all their interdependencies play a crucial role. Such a scenario calls for tool-independent standards for both the modeling approach to the entire system and the exchange of functional models between different tools. In our presentation, we will give an overview of the latest developments with system simulation in the automotive industry. Based on that, we will outline the next necessary steps, from the development of new model elements to the utilization of standardized interfaces for the co-simulation of different tools, in order to meet the requirements for the efficient development of ADAS.

Biografie
Christian Kehrer, born in 1981, has been responsible for accounts in the German speaking regions as Head of Sales DACH at ESI ITI GmbH since 2014. He finished his studies of Mechanical Engineering at the Dresden University of Technology specializing in automotive engineering. From 2006 to 2009, Christian Kehrer worked for TESIS DYNAware GmbH at the BMW Group in Munich as a simulation engineer in charge of overall vehicle energy efficiency and customer behavior. Afterwards, he started his career at ITI GmbH in Dresden, Germany, as Key Account Manager for the automotive sector exploring and developing business opportunities also for new applications.

11:35
CEA Tech innovations in the fields of sensors, computing and communication solutions for highly dependable and secured system.
  THIERRY COLLETTE, VP DIVISION, CEA
CEA Tech innovations in the fields of sensors, computing and communication solutions for highly dependable and secured system.
THIERRY COLLETTE

THIERRY COLLETTE
VP DIVISION
CEA

THIERRY COLLETTE

Abstract
Contributing to the Automotive industry goal for autonomous vehicles, CEA Tech is accelerating its innovations in the fields of sensors, computing and communication solutions for highly dependable and secured system.

Biografie
Thierry Collette is VP division of CEA Leti, wellknown research technology organisation in France. This division (DACLE) is in charge of design of integrated components and embedded systems, represents 300 people and is a joint division between Leti and List. Previously he was deputy director of CEA LIST, the academic French laboratory of technology research on smart systems. He has obtained an Electrical Engineering Degree in 1988 and a Ph.D in Microelectronics of the University of Grenoble in 1992. He wrote, as author and co-author, several papers in conferences and journals on technologies for embedded parallel and reconfigurable computing and holds several patents too. He teaches computer architectures in master degree at Ecole Centrale of Paris and University of Paris XI. He is expert CEA senior and had evaluated several international and national projects (MEDEA, ANR, OSEO, etc) and is member of evaluation committee of the French National Research Agency.

12:00 TBA
  Klaus Pressel, Infineon
12:25
The path towards autonomous driving
  Martin Duncan, Business Unit Director, STMicroelectronics
The path towards autonomous driving
Martin Duncan

Martin Duncan
Business Unit Director
STMicroelectronics

Martin Duncan

Abstract
The complexity of the requirements for automotive applications is increasing at an astonishing pace, none more so than autonomous driving. The acceleration driven by advancing global safety standards (NCAP) calls for a rigorous step by step approach. Concepts from other domains are being introduced in order to address these increasing demands. For example we are now need to cover fault tolerant and failsafe systems. The functional safety of systems, products and processes increases with every day and with every new development and we must maintain a grasp of the risks during every phase: from the first concept through development and from operation through shutdown. With the increased connectivity and complexity there are serious security challenges for the design of automotive hardware/software architectures due to attacks. With the immense processing power that is being unlocked with multi-processor systems we are now able to address complex issues such as a complete inspection of the vehicle’s environment. In this paper we will discuss the challenges of implementing a safe, secure, complex driver assistance system that paves the way towards autonomous driving.

Biografie
Dr. Martin DUNCAN is currently ADAS Business Unit Director in the Automotive & Discrete Product Group of STMicrolectronics and is based in Agrate-Brianza near Milan in Italy. In this role he drives the whole business line in the fast growing area for partially and fully autonomous vehicles. He has been in charge to drive the strategy and implementation for those advanced products and applications since the humble beginnings in 2005. The main products are radar and machine vision sensing & processing. He joined STMicroelectronics in 1990 and has held various positions in R&D before moving into the automotive business arena in 1998 holding marketing roles before serving a two year period in the field (2001-2003) as head of technical marketing in the automotive business unit in Livonia, MI, USA. He has published many papers as Principle author on ADAS, High Voltage CMOS, NVM cell and test structure development. He holds both a B.Sc. (honors) in Microelectronics (1987) and a Ph.D. in Microelectronics from Edinburgh University (1992).

12:50
Getting Self-Driving Cars on the Road
  Stéphane Cordova, Director, Embedded Technology Business Unit, Kalray Inc.
Getting Self-Driving Cars on the Road
Stéphane Cordova

Stéphane Cordova
Director, Embedded Technology Business Unit
Kalray Inc.

Stéphane Cordova

Abstract
There is a revolution growing in the automobile industry: the self-driving car. Today, the car manufacturers have research and development teams working around the clock to get this technology on the road. However, in order for the general public to embrace this disruptive technology, one major hurdle remains: automotive electronics must provide the performance and safety required for ADAS (Advanced Driver Assistance System). To input the information necessary for keeping a vehicle and its passengers safe, an autonomous car will deploy at least 16 sensors, including cameras, radar, Lidar, ultrasonic and other wireless sensor technologies. For cars to be able to drive themselves, these all of the inputs from the sensors must be fused, resulting in the creation of multiple Giga Bytes (GBs) worth of data. The ability to compute this enormous amount of data requires centralized data and demand “supercomputers” or, rather, much higher performance ECUs than currently available. These so-called “number crunchers” must be able to carry out multiple, diverse tasks. By introducing its MPPA manycore processor, Kalray hopes to help the automobile industry overcome this hurdle. Kalray’s processing device is well-suited for performing the various electronics tasks needed by automakers to manufacture autonomous vehicles. The device can also be used for other processing tasks that require standard software programmability, high performances, low power consumption and the support of functional safety.

Biografie
Stéphane is a successful executive with a combined 20 years of experience in business (Sales; Marketing; Business development; BU Mgr) in the semiconductor industry around wireless, video and embedded applications. Prior to his role at Kalray, Stéphane held various business and management positions at STMicroelectronics and ST-Ericsson, where he worked in business development with major OEMs and platform-makers for mobile applications and the multimedia industry.

13:15 Summary
  Wilfried Lerch, Corporate Director R&D and Technology, centrotherm photovoltaics AG
Wilfried Lerch

Wilfried Lerch
Corporate Director R&D and Technology
centrotherm photovoltaics AG

Biography
Dr. Wilfried Lerch (m) holds a Diploma and a PhD in physics both from Westfälische Wilhelms-University Münster. After working on the basic diffusion mechanism during rapid thermal annealing he joined ast electronic GmbH in 1994 which later became Mattson Thermal Products GmbH. Until 2008 he was responsible for process technology at customer sites but also for the advanced, next generation technology and equipment development of lamp-based systems (RTP and Flash). Since 2009 he joined centrotherm photovoltaics AG and is responsible for R&D and technology of all front-end and back-end semiconductor products (furnaces, lamp-based and low-temperature microwave based equipment as well as soldering tools).

13:20 END